cats kittens – Klavlav http://klavlav.org/ Tue, 12 Apr 2022 03:57:59 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://klavlav.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/klav-150x150.png cats kittens – Klavlav http://klavlav.org/ 32 32 Donegal Animals in Need: Sad news as Letterkenny charity shop due to close https://klavlav.org/donegal-animals-in-need-sad-news-as-letterkenny-charity-shop-due-to-close/ Fri, 18 Mar 2022 19:08:58 +0000 https://klavlav.org/donegal-animals-in-need-sad-news-as-letterkenny-charity-shop-due-to-close/ Animals In Need (AIN) have announced the closure of their charity store in Letterkenny. AIN volunteers have run the Lower Main Street shop for six years, having taken it over after Donegal Pet Rescue closed. However, due to high running costs and the current financial climate, the charity shop will have to close permanently on […]]]>

Animals In Need (AIN) have announced the closure of their charity store in Letterkenny.

AIN volunteers have run the Lower Main Street shop for six years, having taken it over after Donegal Pet Rescue closed.

However, due to high running costs and the current financial climate, the charity shop will have to close permanently on March 25, although the Donegal Town AIN shop will remain open.

This is a blow to the organization as charity shops have been a major source of funding for AIN’s day-to-day running costs.

From now until the store closes, there is an “everything must go” sale, so please come by to grab a bargain and show your support one last time. The Letterkenny store is open Tuesday through Friday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Stray cat Susie gave birth to six kittens

AIN would like to thank all the volunteers who have worked in the shop and the customers who have supported it over the years, as you have all helped raise funds that have saved many animals.

There will be a new drop off point in Letterkenny for pet food and toy donations. For more information, please contact AIN on 087-7644420.

Meanwhile, AIN will continue to rescue animals across the county.

The association is currently looking for new canine adopters.

Criteria for becoming a dog foster include being passionate about dogs and wanting to help unwanted ones by taking care of them and giving them lots of TLC while they wait for their forever home.

If this sounds like you and you’re over 18, recently retired, work from home or work part-time, have experience with dogs and a walled garden, your own means of transport and you live within driving distance of Donegal town, you might be just what AIN is looking for.

AIN canine foster families will keep one or two dogs in their home. Outdoor runs can be provided for the dogs, as well as their food and all veterinary costs are covered by the charity.

Caring for rescued animals is not always easy but it is extremely rewarding.

For more information, please contact the main helpline or contact AIN by sending a message to their Facebook page.

If you’re more of a feline person, ‘kitten season’ has just begun, which means there will be hundreds of kittens and cats up for adoption in the near future.

Once again, foster families look after the animals in their own homes and their bedding, food and vet bills are all covered by the charity.

For more information on fostering cats and kittens, please contact the Cat Helpline.

The majority of animals rescued by the AIN are cats and dogs, but they are also called upon from time to time to assist wildlife or to help rehouse other domesticated species.

Last Saturday, AIN rescued an injured herring gull, which was transferred to a wildlife rehabilitation center for treatment.

AIN also has two domesticated baby rabbits in foster care at the moment, after they were found by a cat in his garden.

The rabbits are doing well and their ears are now starting to fall out as they get older. They are still too young to be relocated but will be available in a few weeks.

Back at the cattery, pregnant stray Susie finally gave birth this week.

The two baby rabbits are doing well

Susie was the first pregnant cat to arrive at AIN in 2022 and was already very big when she arrived so it was thought she was due to give birth at any time.

However, she continued to swell for another three weeks until last weekend when she gave birth to six large, healthy kittens.

Mother cat Susie and her kittens are doing well.

To help AIN’s animals, please donate €2 to AIN’s ‘Help Us Help Them’ fundraising appeal via your phone by texting the word ‘KITTEN’ to 50300. Each penny goes directly to rescued animals for their food, bedding and vet bills. , deworming and vaccinations.

For further information on adoption, placement, volunteering etc please contact the main helpline on 087 1356188. For cat/kitten inquiries please call 087 7644420. Animals In Need Donegal is also on Facebook and has a website at http://www.animalsinneeddonegal.com.

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HRM cat breeder helps her friends in Ukraine by selling their cats https://klavlav.org/hrm-cat-breeder-helps-her-friends-in-ukraine-by-selling-their-cats/ Thu, 10 Mar 2022 21:23:15 +0000 https://klavlav.org/hrm-cat-breeder-helps-her-friends-in-ukraine-by-selling-their-cats/ The huge TV in Kristen Janssen’s living room is tuned all day to news of the invasion of Ukraine. She knows people there and she is worried. Janssen, who lives in Indian Harbour, was medically discharged from the Navy in 2016 and began breeding and selling sphynx and Devon rex cats soon after. “I was […]]]>

The huge TV in Kristen Janssen’s living room is tuned all day to news of the invasion of Ukraine. She knows people there and she is worried.

Janssen, who lives in Indian Harbour, was medically discharged from the Navy in 2016 and began breeding and selling sphynx and Devon rex cats soon after.

“I was terrified,” she said, expressing her feelings when war broke out about two weeks ago.

“I have a military background, I’m a veteran, so for me it hits some things for most people, maybe it’s not because I see the seriousness of this a little more clearly. that is happening. The first thing I did was contact all the breeders and I said, ‘Are you safe? Are you in one of these areas? Do you need something?'”

For her business, Special K Sphynx and Devon Rex, she imported many of her “founding cats” from Ukraine, and being in the cat breeding business naturally leads to international networking.

“We just made these friendships, so we’re like extended family,” Janssen said, sitting on her couch as one of her Devon rex cats, a six-month-old child named Archie, climbs on top of her.

Archie, a Devon rex cat, pauses outside the window of his Indian Harbor home on Wednesday. -Ryan Taplin

So Janssen sent a message to everyone she knew in Ukraine asking what she could do to help. Donating to the Red Cross is great, Janssen said, but she wanted to do something for her friends that would have a direct impact.

One of the breeders told Janssen that the best way to help would be to sell and find homes for the cats.

“It’s what they do for a living, they raise cats, so his solution was, ‘Help me find homes for these cats so I can evacuate them, reduce the number of cats I have to occupy myself, and if I have to evacuate, will make it possible if I have 10 to 39 and find safety,” she said.

So Janssen got to work.

Cats for sale

Three Ukrainian breeders provided information on 37 cats, and Janssen took to Facebook. On March 3, she posted on her Facebook page about the need to sell the cats. In three days, all the Devon rex cats were taken care of.

“It goes beyond wanting to adopt a cat,” she said. “These people who have reached out have not only adopted and given these adoption comments to these breeders, but they are making financial donations to support the gas, truck rental and crating payments to send them.

“Everyone is really coming together and doing their best.”

Bruno, a 17-day-old Devon rex kitten, at cat breeder Kristen Janssen's in Indian Harbor on Wednesday.  -Ryan Taplin
Bruno, a 17-day-old Devon rex kitten, at cat breeder Kristen Janssen’s in Indian Harbor on Wednesday. -Ryan Taplin

This means that breeders receive $28,000 in Canadian funds. Janssen said the money will help them buy groceries, pet food and anything else they need in case they need to evacuate.

The Facebook post was shared by other breeders, so buyers of the cats are from Canada and the United States, but most come to live in Nova Scotia.

  • 19 cats arrive in Atlantic Canada.
  • 14 will remain in NS.
  • Five will go to N.B.
  • Four are going to the United States
  • The rest go to Saskatchewan, British Columbia and Ontario

Janssen said two other Ukrainian breeders were grooming their cats for her to sell.

Help people by helping cats

More than a few people have commented online that Ukrainian breeders should leave their cats behind and go outside. Others said Janssen should focus on helping people instead of getting cats out of the country.

“My answer is, yes, on paper it looks like I’m saving cats and not people. But the reality is I’m saving cats from an unknown future, but I’m also giving to those people, breeders, their families and their close friends financial means to support them, their remaining pets and a way out if they have to evacuate because the financial resources are not there,” she said.

None of the breeders she knows are ready to go without their animals and as a breeder, Janssen said she can understand that.

“Don’t get me wrong, a lot of herders had to leave, they had no choice and they couldn’t bring their animals. I don’t want to blame them for making that decision because I’m not in that situation. … I don’t envy their decisions to be made at this time.

With the gratitude of Ukraine

Lyudmila Gritsishin, who lives about 110 kilometers from Lviv, Ukraine, said Devon rex cats have become her family and her life. She bought her first cat in 2016 and opened a cattery called MilaGree*s.

She used to live in Kiev, which was hammered by Russian forces, but recently moved to western Ukraine to be with her 87-year-old mother. She says it was a “happy decision” as her home is still intact.

“When I heard on the morning of February 24 that the war had started, I was not worried about myself, I was worried about my cats, because I had little kittens, adult cats and (cats ) pregnant,” she wrote in a Facebook Messenger Interview.

Gritsishin said she has a breeding program planned for a year and a half. She said she was very worried about how she was going to feed her cats as her country was under attack.

“And here, as our guardian angel, Kristen comes to our aid,” she wrote. “Kristen not only found new homes for our cats, but also gave us the opportunity to survive this terrible war. Now I know I can save my cattery, and five years of hard work will not be wasted.

“I will be able to survive and I will also be able to help other people who need help. I am forever grateful to Kristen for her help! She not only helped us, she saved our dreams!

Janssen sold six of Gritsishin’s kittens and three adult cats.

And now that many of her cats are on their way to their new homes, Gritsishin said she takes cats from breeders in Kyiv to help and bring them out as well.

“Thank you very much to everyone who does not remain indifferent to the horror that is currently happening in my beautiful country! Thank you for the support!”

Lyudmila Gritsishin, who lives outside Lviv, Ukraine, is grateful to HRM cat breeder Kristen Janssen who sold six of her kittens and three adult cats.
Lyudmila Gritsishin, who lives outside Lviv, Ukraine, is grateful to HRM cat breeder Kristen Janssen who sold six of her kittens and three adult cats.

Getting cats out of Ukraine

On Tuesday, a volunteer took 20 cats and eight people to wait in the long lines to cross the Polish border, Janssen said.

A Polish breeder on the other side picked them up at the border. Then another breeder brought them back to Warsaw where she will take care of them until they can fly away.

The other 17 cats will travel a similar route once the first group takes off.

All cats destined for homes in the Maritimes will remain with Janssen. A local veterinarian, Rhonda MacDonald of Timberlea Animal Hospital, volunteered to examine the cats after they arrived.

Even after all that work — responding to more than 3,000 messages in four days and falling asleep with her phone in her hand — Janssen said she wished she could do more.

“Honestly, I still don’t feel like I’m doing enough,” she said.

“I wish there were more, but I keep being told (Ukrainian breeders) ‘our families don’t help us that much, we can never repay the kindness we receive from Canadians and people of all over North America.

On Wednesday, cat breeder Kristen Janssen holds Bella, a 17-day-old Devon rex kitten, in her Indian Harbor home.  -Ryan Taplin
On Wednesday, cat breeder Kristen Janssen holds Bella, a 17-day-old Devon rex kitten, in her Indian Harbor home. -Ryan Taplin

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Looking for very special cat parents in the province of Almeria https://klavlav.org/looking-for-very-special-cat-parents-in-the-province-of-almeria/ Sat, 05 Mar 2022 17:39:23 +0000 https://klavlav.org/looking-for-very-special-cat-parents-in-the-province-of-almeria/ PAWS-PATAS CHARITY: currently cares for 57 cats and kittens Photo credit: Chrissie Cremore PAWS-PATAS, the Los Gallardos-based animal charity, calls the “one in a million cat parents”. Chrissie Cremore, Vice President of PAWS-PATAS, told the Weekly Euro News that anyone fitting that description would be the solution to one of their problems. There are some […]]]>

PAWS-PATAS CHARITY: currently cares for 57 cats and kittens Photo credit: Chrissie Cremore

PAWS-PATAS, the Los Gallardos-based animal charity, calls the “one in a million cat parents”.

Chrissie Cremore, Vice President of PAWS-PATAS, told the Weekly Euro News that anyone fitting that description would be the solution to one of their problems.

There are some conditions, though, as these cat parents must live on a rural property with no other cats and be willing to adopt at least two “lovely, sweet, Calicivirus-friendly cats,” Chrissie said.

“Calicivirus is a highly contagious cat-specific respiratory infection that can cause difficulty breathing, sore gums, and watery eyes and nose,” she explained.

“Many shelter cats have this but show no active signs of infection and are healthy, beautiful, happy youngsters with a long life to live. They deserve a home, with space to play and laps. to sleep,” she said.

“PAWS-PATAS will pay any calicivirus-related veterinary bills that may arise and would be available to give you advice. It’s a ‘win-win’ situation for everyone,” Chrissie said.

For more information on adopting Calicivirus cats, visit www.paws-patas.org.

“And we also need volunteers to help out at the cattery where we currently care for 57 cats and kittens,” Chrissie added.

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Don’t expect adoptable cats from a shelter to act the way they will in a home https://klavlav.org/dont-expect-adoptable-cats-from-a-shelter-to-act-the-way-they-will-in-a-home/ Wed, 02 Mar 2022 10:02:56 +0000 https://klavlav.org/dont-expect-adoptable-cats-from-a-shelter-to-act-the-way-they-will-in-a-home/ When it comes to adopting a cat, what you see is NOT always what you get. If the roles were reversed and you were inside the cage with a family of cats watching you, how would you react? Living in a cage, on display is not normal – so we can’t expect adoptable cats to […]]]>
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Adopt a cat from the RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub – latest list https://klavlav.org/adopt-a-cat-from-the-rspca-cat-rehoming-hub-latest-list/ Tue, 15 Feb 2022 13:52:24 +0000 https://klavlav.org/adopt-a-cat-from-the-rspca-cat-rehoming-hub-latest-list/ These cats are looking for a forever home in the North East after facing difficult circumstances so far. The RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub works with local RSPCA branches to rehom cats and kittens rescued by RSPCA officers in the Darlington, Stockton, Northallerton, Middlesbrough and North Yorkshire areas. Cats have often faced cruelty, neglect and abandonment […]]]>

These cats are looking for a forever home in the North East after facing difficult circumstances so far.

The RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub works with local RSPCA branches to rehom cats and kittens rescued by RSPCA officers in the Darlington, Stockton, Northallerton, Middlesbrough and North Yorkshire areas.

Cats have often faced cruelty, neglect and abandonment or sad situations where their owner could no longer care for them or died.

From a cattery just outside of Darlington and an extensive network of volunteer foster families, it takes in around 250 cats each year, making it one of the most successful catteries in the country.

Here are some of the cats currently looking for their new forever home at the RSPCA Cat Hub.

Cats for adoption near Darlington, Stockton, Northallerton and Middlesbrough

bella

Tabby Bella is a 10 year old female indoor cat. She was transferred to the RSPCA when her owner sadly passed away.

Bella seeks to be the only animal in a home with adults or older children.

Once settled in and used to her surroundings, Bella will enjoy lots of cuddles and cat naps on the sofa.

If you would like to adopt Bella or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

Theo

The Echo of the North: Photos via the RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.Photos via the RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.

Theo was rescued by the RSPCA as a stray dog. He is a young adult male cat who is very friendly and seems to like everyone he meets.

He is looking to live in a house with older children or adults with access to the outdoors.

Theo doesn’t seem to get along with other cats and wants to be the only pet in the house.

If you would like to adopt Theo or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

Frankie

Echo of the North:

Frankie is a black and white adult male cat, approximately 5 years old.

He is a beautiful, large cat, but shy and nervous, whose confidence is slowly improving in foster care.

He has gradually accepted beatings and generally prefers the company of men, as he comes out of his cat tree to tickle ears whenever his adoptive male passes by.

Frankie seeks to be the only animal in an adult-only home with owners who will give her time and space for her character and confidence to emerge.

In time, he may want to go out, but only in a catio.

If you would like to adopt Frankie or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

bella and tiger

The Echo of the North: Photos via the RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.Photos via the RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.

Bonded cats Bella and Tiger search for their forever home together.

Bella is black and six years old while Tiger is a 12 year old black tortoiseshell.

They are lovely, calm cats who have been registered with the RSPCA and are looking for a home indoors with older children or adults.

Tiger is the boss with a bolder, more people-oriented personality. Meanwhile, Bella is still a bit shy.

If you would like to adopt Bella and Tiger or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

Leila

The Echo of the North: Photos via the RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.Photos via the RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.

Leyla is a nine year old cat who has been registered with the RSPCA.

She once lived with a dog but doesn’t seem to get along with other cats, so she wants to be the only cat in the house.

Leyla is very affectionate, talkative and loves cuddles. She wants to be an indoor cat in a household with adults or older children.

She is currently enjoying a bit of TLC with one of the fabulous foster homes at the RSPCA Cat Hub.

If you would like to adopt Leyla or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

The RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub

The RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub is funded by four local RSPCA branches – Darlington and District Branch, Stockton-on-Tees based North Teesside and District Branch, Middlesbrough Branch, South Branch Tees and District and Northallerton, Thirsk and Dales branch.

Along with the rest of the RSPCA, the operation of the RSPCA Cat Hub is funded entirely by donations from the general public.

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Kitten Therapy Launch – Germiston City News https://klavlav.org/kitten-therapy-launch-germiston-city-news/ Mon, 14 Feb 2022 04:02:12 +0000 https://klavlav.org/kitten-therapy-launch-germiston-city-news/ A cat changed the life of Jordan Soares, and now, as a self-confessed catwoman, she’s on a mission to change the lives of other cats. READ ALSO: City walks Bedfordview resident Jordan runs Germiston-based NPO Cat Mom. She hopes her unique approach to running her cattery and raising funds for the kittens she cares for […]]]>

A cat changed the life of Jordan Soares, and now, as a self-confessed catwoman, she’s on a mission to change the lives of other cats.

READ ALSO: City walks

Bedfordview resident Jordan runs Germiston-based NPO Cat Mom.

She hopes her unique approach to running her cattery and raising funds for the kittens she cares for will catch the attention of donors and future adoptees.

“It all started with a cat during the 2020 lockdown, when I had a feral cat that regularly visited my house.

One day she brought me her kitten, and I named him Max.

“I was never a cat person, but somehow this little girl kept coming back. Then one day she came back pregnant.

Jordan arranged for the mother cat, now named Lilly, to be trapped and neutered.

She has also found homes for her new litter of kittens.

After his sterilization, Lilly joined Max as a member of the Soares family.

“It was the cat that started it all for me.”

Jordan said she knew she could do more, and in August 2020 she joined her aunt in turning part of her aunt’s Germiston property into a cattery.

“My aunt helped me set everything up and I started getting calls from people who needed help.”

A cat changed the life of Jordan Soares and now, as a self-confessed catwoman, she is on a mission to change the lives of other cats.

The facility now has a dedicated isolation area for sick and recovering kittens, as well as spacious, well-equipped rooms and catteos for the 64 cats and kittens cared for by Cat Mom.

In August Cat Mom was registered as an official NPO and earlier this year Jordan and his team reached capacity.

“Early on, I realized that there were more kittens that needed help than people were willing to adopt.”

She thinks it’s because there are still many misconceptions about cats.

To achieve her goal, Jordan took a unique approach to both education and networking with the kittens she cares for.

“So many people have said that playing with my cats and kittens is therapeutic. I thought it was a good idea to open therapy sessions with kittens for the community.

“I decided to put a poll on various social media pages asking if anyone would be interested in kitten therapy and there was such interest.”

She explained that residents can book a therapy session of an hour or more with Cat Mom and during that time they can relax and play with kittens or sit down and read a book.

Alternatively, residents are also welcome to have a meal during their session.

“When people arrive they are given a packet of catnip to use and a toy which they return at the end of their session.

“During the therapy session, visitors can play, observe and interact with our kittens.”
Jordan said the idea of ​​kitten therapy is a growing trend in countries like Japan and she hopes it will take off in South Africa as well.

Jordan said she knew she could do more and in August 2020 she joined her aunt in turning part of her aunt’s Germiston property into a cattery.

“Playing with cats and kittens is a great way to relax and unwind.

“The main idea behind the therapy is to raise money for Cat Mom to help with spaying and care of the kittens at the shelter, but we also hope that someone who falls in love with one or more of the kittens and is considering adopt.”

The first hour of Kitten Therapy will cost R150 and R50 for each subsequent hour, and sessions must be booked in advance.

“A maximum of four people will be allowed in therapy at a time. It’s not just about complying with Covid regulations, it’s also about ensuring everyone has a fair chance and as many kitten cuddles as possible.

“We are still a brand new organization. You never really know how big the problem is until you’re in the middle of it.

“I get at least four calls a day for people who need help with cats. Everything from mother cats needing to be neutered to feral cat rescues and people who would like to abandon their kittens from a unexpected reach.

Cat Mom has helped cats and kittens from around Gauteng and even as far away as Rustenburg.

“I always knew I wanted to help people, now I’m helping cats that will help people. It’s a beautiful cycle.

While Jordan and his dedicated team ensure that each kitten and teenage cat is cared for, Cat Mom’s resident cats, Sam and Doppel, take on the role of caregivers for the kittens.

“Sam was never a mom, but she lovingly took on the role of all the kittens brought in. Together with Doppel, she teaches the new kittens the ropes.”

Like any organization, Cat Mom is always in need of donations, including food, cat scratchers, and litter.

“We can also use anything like books for our therapy library and even empty boxes because cats love boxes.”

Cat Mom adoptions cost R850 per kitten, which includes neutering at five months, full vaccination, microchipping and up-to-date tick and flea treatments.

In addition, each kitten undergoes a check before leaving for its forever home.

“I want the best for the kittens. Many of them had a rough start in life and Cat Mom was the start of their new life. Cats changed my life and now it’s my turn to change theirs,” Jordan said.
For more information or to book a chatonotherapy session, contact Cat Mom on 084 277 8888 or on [email protected]

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Are you going back to school in the spring? Here are some of the kennels and catteries in Preston to keep your pets safe and cared for https://klavlav.org/are-you-going-back-to-school-in-the-spring-here-are-some-of-the-kennels-and-catteries-in-preston-to-keep-your-pets-safe-and-cared-for/ Tue, 08 Feb 2022 17:11:26 +0000 https://klavlav.org/are-you-going-back-to-school-in-the-spring-here-are-some-of-the-kennels-and-catteries-in-preston-to-keep-your-pets-safe-and-cared-for/ Need the service of a cattery kennel? So look no further We scoured Google to find out what Preston has to offer. Here is a selection of some of the kennels and catteries we found… Fur Cottage Kennels and Cattery – Fleetwood Old Road, Greenhalgh, Kirkham, Preston Rating 4.7 out of 5. One reviewer said: […]]]>
Need the service of a cattery kennel? So look no further

We scoured Google to find out what Preston has to offer. Here is a selection of some of the kennels and catteries we found…

Fur Cottage Kennels and Cattery – Fleetwood Old Road, Greenhalgh, Kirkham, Preston

Rating 4.7 out of 5. One reviewer said: “What a fantastic kennel. Donnie (our dog) had the best time, he was so happy and relaxed from the moment we dropped him off to the moment we we got it back.”

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A good dog house is essential for your pooch when you leave

Visit their website here.

Landorn Pension Kennels & Cattery – Tabley Lane, Higher Bartle, Preston

Rating 4.9 out of 5. One reviewer said, “Awesome place with very caring and caring staff. My dog ​​obviously enjoyed his stay and will use Landorn again next time we go.”

Visit their website here.

Do you have a favorite cattery?

Champion Boarding Kennels & Cattery – Estoril / Syke House Lane, Preston

Rating 4.6 out of 5. One reviewer said, “Friendly, caring people who I really trust with my best friend when I’m away.”

Hey Barn Catteries and Kennels – Cuerdale Hey Farm / Fox Lane, Preston

Rating 4.9 out of 5. One reviewer said, “We have used these kennels for our dog on several occasions. He has always been well exercised and cared for. The facility is nice and we always feel happy to leave him there .”

Meadow Green Cattery – Moss House Lane, Westby, Preston

Rating 4.9 out of 5. One reviewer said, “Fantastic place. The team are very professional and my cats are very relaxed and very well cared for.”

Visit their website here.

Pension Badgerswood Kennels and Cattery – Whitters Lane, Winmarleigh, Garstang, Preston

Rating 5 out of 5. One reviewer said, “Friendly, clean kennels. All animals are cared for as if they belonged to the owner.

Visit their website here.

The Paddocks – Luxury Cat Hotel – Green Lane, Preston

Rating 5 out of 5. One reviewer said, “This is honestly the best place to put your cats when you need them. The staff are amazing, professional and so lovely.”

Visit their website here.

North View Cats Hotel – North View, Skitham Ln, Pilling, Preston

Rating 4.6 out of 5. One reviewer said: “We chose the North View Cats Hotel based on recommendations and were very pleased with our choice. Our two cats returned home very satisfied and healthy after their one week stay.”

Visit their website here.

Bannister Hall Cattery – Bannister Hall Lane, Higher Walton, Preston

Rating 4.9 out of 5. One reviewer said, “A fabulous cattery. The care given is amazing. Daily updates and a full report on how the cat has been. Highly recommend.”

Visit their website here.

Cats2Stay – Moss Ln, New Longton, Preston

Rating 4.5 out of 5. One reviewer said, “We’ve left our indoor cats here since they were kittens and they’re now 6. We wouldn’t leave them anywhere else.”

Visit their website here.

Barton Boarding Kennels – Hallidays Farm, Barton Lane, Barton, Preston

Rating 4.7 out of 5. One reviewer said, “Kept my two German Shepherds there for 6 nights. Good people with experience. Nice clean place. Highly recommended.”

Visit their website here.

Lilliput Kennels – Meadow Green, Preston

Rating 4.5 out of 5. One reviewer said, “Highly recommend these kennels. Very caring and dog is very happy to go. Grooming is first class.”

Visit their website here.

If you are looking for something else or further, click on here to see all Lancashire kennels and catteries via Google Maps.

It’s thanks to our loyal readership that we can continue to deliver the trusted news, analysis and information that matters to you. For unlimited access to our unparalleled local reporting, you can purchase a subscription HERE

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8 RSPCA cats seeking homes in the North East https://klavlav.org/8-rspca-cats-seeking-homes-in-the-north-east/ Tue, 18 Jan 2022 10:38:46 +0000 https://klavlav.org/8-rspca-cats-seeking-homes-in-the-north-east/ These cats are looking for a forever home in the North East after facing difficult circumstances so far. The RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub works with local RSPCA branches to rehom cats and kittens rescued by RSPCA officers in the Darlington, Stockton, Northallerton, Middlesbrough and North Yorkshire areas. Cats have often faced cruelty, neglect and abandonment […]]]>

These cats are looking for a forever home in the North East after facing difficult circumstances so far.

The RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub works with local RSPCA branches to rehom cats and kittens rescued by RSPCA officers in the Darlington, Stockton, Northallerton, Middlesbrough and North Yorkshire areas.

Cats have often faced cruelty, neglect and abandonment or sad situations where their owner could no longer care for them or died.

From a cattery just outside of Darlington and an extensive network of volunteer foster families, it takes in approximately 250 cats each year, making it one of the most successful catteries in the country.

Here are some of the cats currently looking for their new forever home at the RSPCA Cat Hub.

Pictured is Tiggy. Photos via RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.

Tiggy

The RSPCA Cat Hub is looking for a very special person to adopt Tiggy, a 16-year-old tortoiseshell cat. She’s been at the cattery for six months and no one is interested in her at all!

Tiggy, who came to the RSPCA Cat Hub due to her former owner’s poor health, could be described as Darlington’s loneliest cat – as she is grumpy, only likes to be patted on the head and doesn’t don’t like other cats.

She’ll never really be a cat or want lots of cuddles, so she’s looking for a patient, understanding owner who’s willing to accept her for who she is, because she won’t change much at her age.

However, Tiggy slowly begins to accept treats from people’s hands, the rescue hopes she will bond with the right owner over time – perhaps just one person in a quiet home with no other animals.

She is an indoor cat and will provide constant companionship to her new owner.

If you would like to adopt Tiggy or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

Whiskey and Felix

The Northern Echo: Whiskey and Felix, pictured above.  Photos via RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.Whiskey and Felix, pictured above. Photos via RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub.

Whiskey (black and white) and Felix (tabby) are a couple of 11-year-old male cats looking for a new home together.

They were signed with the RSPCA and entered the RSPCA Cat Hub after their elderly owner had to move.

They are a friendly and cuddly couple who would love to have access to the outdoors. But they are not very active at the cattery, preferring to snuggle up against each other in their basket.

Whiskey and Felix want to be the only cats in the house. They would suit a calmer household, possibly with older children, who have the time and patience to bring out their characters, as they are still only middle-aged cats.

If you would like to adopt Whiskey and Felix or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

Oscar

The Echo of the North: pictured, Oscar.Pictured is Oscar.

Oscar is a handsome cream colored male cat, about eight years old.

He’s a complex but confident character who doesn’t seem to be aware of his own size, as he’s already proven clumsy and good at turning things around.

He is looking for patient, tolerant and experienced cat owners in a household, possibly with cat-loving teenagers, with the time to watch him closely in their home.

It was transferred to the RSPCA when its owner died and his family members were unable to keep it.

Oscar needs access to a garden and would probably like to be the only pet in the house.

If you would like to adopt Oscar or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

Tilly and Sooty

The Echo of the North: Sooty and Tilly, pictured.Sooty and Tilly, pictured.

Tilly (tortoiseshell) and Sooty (black) are six-year-old cats who previously lived outdoors where they were cared for by an elderly lady. They were cared for by the RSPCA when their owner entered a nursing home.

Both Tilly and Sooty are shy and not very active at the cattery, but are gradually becoming more confident. It’s true for Tilly who loves caresses and rubbing her legs.

They are both looking for a quiet, adults-only home with experienced cat owners and outdoor access. They have already lived with other cats.

If you’d like to adopt Tilly and Sooty or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

Day before

The Echo of the North: Eve, pictured.Eve, pictured.

Eve is a tabby and white, visually impaired adult female cat, approximately two to five years old. She was picked up as a stray by the RSPCA.

She is a friendly girl who has settled in well in the cattery. She must be a full-time indoor cat and ideally seeks an owner experienced in caring for cats with sight problems. This could be in a household with older, cat-loving children.

Due to her sight problems, she wants to be the only cat in the house, as she will not be able to read the body language of other cats.

If you’d like to adopt Tilly and Sooty or get more information, you can visit the RSPCA Cat Hub website for the rehoming process here.

The RSPCA Cat Rehoming Hub is funded by four local RSPCA branches – the Darlington and District Branch, the North Teesside and District Branch based in Stockton-on-Tees, the Middlesbrough Branch, the South Branch Tees and District and Northallerton, Thirsk and Dales branch.

Along with the rest of the RSPCA, the operation of the RSPCA Cat Hub is funded entirely by donations from the general public.

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How much do cat vaccines cost? – Forbes UK Advisor https://klavlav.org/how-much-do-cat-vaccines-cost-forbes-uk-advisor/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 20:17:16 +0000 https://klavlav.org/how-much-do-cat-vaccines-cost-forbes-uk-advisor/ Cats are extremely popular pets. In fact, according to a 2021 study by veterinary charity PDSA, 24% of the UK adult population own a cat. And the estimated cat population in the UK stands at 10.7 million. If you’re a cat owner, their health comfort is likely to be a top priority and one simple […]]]>

Cats are extremely popular pets. In fact, according to a 2021 study by veterinary charity PDSA, 24% of the UK adult population own a cat. And the estimated cat population in the UK stands at 10.7 million.

If you’re a cat owner, their health comfort is likely to be a top priority and one simple way to protect your cat against a range of illnesses is to keep up to date with their vaccinations.

In this guide, we take a look at what you need to know about cat vaccines, which ones a cat needs and when they need them, up to how much they are likely to cost.

What vaccines do cats and kittens need?

If you live in the UK, cats should be vaccinated against:

  • cat flu (feline herpes virus and feline calicivirus) – this causes symptoms similar to the human cold and flu such as sneezing, snotty nose, sore or watery eyes, fever, low energy, cough and a sore throat. It can be serious, even fatal, for kittens, but is usually not serious for healthy adult cats.
  • Feline infectious enteritis (also known as FPV, feline parvovirus and feline panleukopenia) – this is a disease that attacks a cat’s gut and immune system. It can also attack the heart. Young kittens often suffer from more severe symptoms than healthy adult cats. Kittens from an infected pregnant cat can be born with brain damage.
  • Feline leukemia virus (essential for outdoor cats) – this is a virus that attacks the cat’s immune system and can be fatal. It can cause cancer, anemia and make cats susceptible to other infections.

Other nonessential vaccines for cats include:

  • Chlamydophila felis – this is a bacterium that causes eye infections and symptoms similar to cat flu. Your cat will usually only need this vaccination if it has suffered from it in the past.
  • Rage – this is a deadly virus but as it is not currently a problem in the UK it will only be necessary if your cat is traveling overseas or you are adopting a cat from the UK ‘foreigner.

If you’re not sure which vaccines your cat needs, talk to your veterinarian.

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How often do kittens and cats need vaccines?

Kittens need two sets of initial vaccines. One to nine weeks and a second booster at three months. Some kittens may also need a third injection at 15 weeks. A kitten will be fully protected three to four weeks after their last injection and you should keep your kitten indoors and away from cats outside your household until then.

After this primary course, cats usually need reminders once a year. You should receive a vaccination record from your veterinarian to remind you when the next course is due.

How much do cat vaccines cost?

Prices vary depending on the vaccines your cat needs – indoor cats, for example, are likely to need fewer. Different veterinary practices also charge different prices, so check the website or call ahead to avoid any surprises.

However, a cost of around £65 for a kitten’s first two injections and £45 for annual cat boosters is fairly standard, according to insurer PetPlan.

If you have a few local veterinary practices to choose from, the cost of vaccinations may be one of the factors you use to make your choice, alongside other considerations such as location and hours of operation, recommendations friends and family, or staff and facilities.

Some veterinarians may offer a health care plan for your cat that will allow you to split the cost of preventative treatments such as vaccinations, flea and worm treatment, and checkups. If you are eligible for financial support, some animal charities such as the RSPCA and Blue Cross may be able to help with veterinary bills.

Are cat vaccinations covered by pet insurance?

Pet insurance is designed to cover high costs in the event of an unexpected injury or illness. Thus, regular scheduled care such as vaccinations, flea treatment and deworming are generally not covered.

However, you may be offered lower insurance premiums if your cat is vaccinated, while some insurers may require your cat to be up to date with their vaccinations for your policy to be valid – so always read the terms and conditions carefully and set reminders. in your calendar for vaccination dates.

What does pet insurance cover?

Although pet insurance won’t cover your cat’s vaccinations, it’s worth buying to give you peace of mind that you’ll have financial protection if your cat gets sick or injured. Comprehensive cat insurance can cover:

  • Veterinary bills for new illnesses, conditions and injuries
  • The purchase price of your pet if it dies from accidental injury (there is usually an age limit for this)
  • Cattery fees if you have to go to the hospital unexpectedly.

Always read the terms and conditions of any policy you are considering carefully so that you feel comfortable with what is covered. And don’t forget to shop around to find the best policy for your cat at the most competitive price.

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WITH VIDEO: Cats rescued from “deplorable” conditions at a breeder | News, Sports, Jobs https://klavlav.org/with-video-cats-rescued-from-deplorable-conditions-at-a-breeder-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 08:00:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/with-video-cats-rescued-from-deplorable-conditions-at-a-breeder-news-sports-jobs/ News Photo by Julie Riddle Cages of rescued cats fill a cell in the old Alpena County Jail building on Monday. ALPENA – A fatal accident on New Year’s Eve north of Alpena led police to discover dozens of malnourished cats, surrounded by debris and excrement, in a house that also served as the headquarters […]]]>

News Photo by Julie Riddle Cages of rescued cats fill a cell in the old Alpena County Jail building on Monday.

ALPENA – A fatal accident on New Year’s Eve north of Alpena led police to discover dozens of malnourished cats, surrounded by debris and excrement, in a house that also served as the headquarters of a breeder in the one of the rarest cat breeds in the world.

Police say up to 100 cats apparently lived for years among mountains of trash, hundreds of empty cat food cans and the corpses of other animals unable to survive the conditions at the Alpena Township home. .

The old Alpena County Jail building has been set up as a temporary shelter for the rescued cats, as their numbers are too large to fit in the Alpena County Animal Control Facility.

On Monday, cats watched from cages lined up on metal bunks in the old cells, some emaciated and shivering, meowing hoarsely, others silent and motionless.

Researchers found the cats in “deplorable condition to say the least,” said Alpena County Animal Control Officer Michelle Reid, who led the removal of the animals from the home.

News Photo by Julie Riddle Seen through a cell door window, Alpena County Animal Control Officer Michelle Reid tries to catch a panicked cat that ran away when several dozen cats rescued were moved to the old Alpena County Jail building over the weekend. Reid caught the cat safely.

Home resident Candice Massey died in what police suspect was a medical accident at the intersection of US 23-North and Golf Course Road around 10 p.m. Friday.

Called to the scene because responders found four cats in Massey’s vehicle, Reid recognized the cats as Havanese Browns, an extremely rare breed of cat bred by Massey.

When she looked out the garage window of Massey’s house the next morning, “there were nothing but cats everywhere,” Reid said.

Reid and Otsego County Animal Control workers removed 38 cats, three ducks and a chicken from the home over the weekend.

Reid estimated that there were still 40 or 50 cats left in the house, many of them cowering in spaces above ceiling tiles or hiding under mounds of accumulated household items and trash.

News Photo by Julie Riddle A Siamese-like variant of a Havana brown cat peers through the bars of a cage in the old Alpena County Jail building on Monday.

‘BROWN BEAUTIES’

Known for his pleasant and affectionate temperament as much as his chocolate brown color and distinctive head shape, the Havana brown’s ancestry includes the worthy Siamese cat, a lineage written on the black masked faces of some of the cats and kittens taken of the house of Massey. .

Rescuers also found domestic short-haired cats, apparently used for breeding, Reid said.

According to cat-enthusiast websites, Massey bred Havana Browns for 35 years under the trade name Acapella Cattery and was affiliated with several national cat associations.

In cat-loving online forum posts dating back decades, Massey has enthusiastically defended the “brown beauties” she has bred, encouraging other breeders to be ethical and generous in their care for the breed.

News Photo by Julie Riddle Droppings cover the floor of a home in Alpena Township where several dozen rare cats were rescued over the weekend.

According to some online sites, Massey helped lead a movement to strengthen the breed’s delicate lineage through a genetic diversity program.

Several websites list Massey as the contact person for a Havana brown rescue group.

Reid, who knew the breeder when the assistant worked for an Alpena vet decades ago, called Massey a brilliant and “super nice” woman.

“I had no idea this was happening,” Reid said.

INVITABLE CONDITIONS

News Photo by Julie Riddle Alpena County Animal Control Officer Michelle Reid wipes away tears as she searches for cats amid debris at the Alpena Township home of a rare cat breeder on Monday .

Surrounded by woods at the end of a dead-end road, Massey’s home showed signs that its resident suffered from mental illness, his extreme disorder indicative of the hoarding impulses that Massey’s brother said the rancher had long had. struggled, Reid said.

On Monday, hundreds of empty cans of Special Kitty cat food, some covered in rust, filled the garage floors and hallways. In a side room, several inches of feces covered the floor, while a row of cat tape hung in a doorway.

Amidst the rubbish lay small bones, cleaned.

“They literally eat each other to stay alive,” Reid said.

Other small bodies, still intact, lay on a tarp in the backyard, removed by workers during rescue efforts the day before.

News Photo by Julie Riddle Litter boxes stacked on Monday lean in a precarious heap in the living room of a home in Alpena Township where police found dozens of malnourished cats over the weekend.

The unlivable conditions were why Massey’s car was showing signs of living there, Reid said.

Reid, who expected to find cats in the dozen live traps she had left around the house overnight, baited with food, pulled only one caged cat out of the house.

“Well, that’s more than disappointing,” she said, worrying about the eerie silence of the house where she believed several dozen cats were still hiding. “I’m so scared they’ll die, damn it.”

Slight noises above a ceiling tile gave the officer hope that some cats might still come out of the house, although her flashlight beam went out as she stood on a rickety table to look through a hole in the ceiling.

“There are still so many cats here,” the animal control officer said, tears in her eyes as she wondered how to find the remaining cats before they died. “How do you explain to a cat that you are trying to save it? »

‘SAY SOMETHING’

Apparently no one saw how Massey lived with his cats, “and if they did, shame on them for not reporting what they saw,” Reid said.

Michigan law dictates how breeders raise dogs, but the state has no regulatory oversight over cat breeders, according to Pollyanne McKillop, animal shelter program manager for the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development. Michigan.

Local governments can regulate animal care and keeping, including the number and types of pets people can have, McKillop said.

The Township of Alpena website does not list a specific animal care ordinance.

Police believe other animals may be living in similar squalid conditions in the Alpena area. They need the help of residents who are willing to speak up when they notice something is wrong, Alpena County Sheriff Steven Kieliszewski said Monday outside Massey’s home.

“If you see something, say something,” Kieliszewski said, pointing to the front window of the house. “There is more.”

Had Massey’s cats been discovered before his death, police could have charged him with violating state cruelty and neglect laws.

Or, Kieliszewski said, she could have gotten the mental health help she needed.

NEW HOUSES

Massey’s brother granted police jurisdiction over the rescued cats, Reid said.

Most cats have upper respiratory diseases, and many – especially Havana browns, with less robust builds than domestic shorthairs – are undernourished, some unable to eat regular cat food because that their thin body can’t handle it.

The cats will remain in the old prison while workers carry out health checks and ensure that those already mentioned by people who have done business with Massey are united with their cats.

Once the dust settles, the county will hold an adoption day for some cats, sending others to shelters and animal shelters, Reid said.

County workers will neuter and neuter all animals before they go to new homes, Reid said.

To contribute

Donations to help pay for the care of Havana brown cats rescued from a hoarding situation this weekend, and other animals rescued from dangerous living situations, can be turned over to the Alpena County Sheriff’s Office at 4900 M-32 West in Alpena, with checks made out to Alpena County Animal Control.

News Photo by Julie Riddle With cat show prizes hanging in the foreground, Kat Tomaszewski of the Alpena County Sheriff’s Department puts fresh food into a live trap left in a township home on Monday. ‘Alpena where police found dozens of rare cats in a hoarding situation over the weekend.

News Photo by Julie Riddle A cat skull lies among old cat food cans and debris in the garage of a home in Alpena Township where several dozen cats were found in a hoarding situation this weekend.

News Photo by Julie Riddle Malnourished brown Havana cats watch nervously from a cage in the old Alpena County Jail building Monday after being rescued from a hoarding situation at a home in the canton of Alpena this weekend.

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