Cattery food – Klavlav http://klavlav.org/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 09:56:50 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://klavlav.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/klav-150x150.png Cattery food – Klavlav http://klavlav.org/ 32 32 Pat’s Wildways: For the Love of Cats https://klavlav.org/pats-wildways-for-the-love-of-cats/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 08:40:38 +0000 https://klavlav.org/pats-wildways-for-the-love-of-cats/ By Pat Foster TurleySeptember 23, 2022 There’s nothing better for Pat Foster-Turley than a lap full of kittens. I have always been a cat person. Throughout middle school and high school, I volunteered and eventually got paid to work at the local animal hospital, where I was known to be able to calm the most […]]]>

By Pat Foster Turley
September 23, 2022

There’s nothing better for Pat Foster-Turley than a lap full of kittens.

I have always been a cat person. Throughout middle school and high school, I volunteered and eventually got paid to work at the local animal hospital, where I was known to be able to calm the most frightened cats. Bucko and I have always had a cat throughout our 46 years together, but only one at a time, all calico/torties. Both Bandita and Masala lived to be around 18 years old, and our current cat Dumela is only 10 years old with hopefully another eight.

Bucko is adamant about being a one-cat household, but that’s not enough love for the cats in my life. Now that I have discovered volunteer opportunities at the Nassau Humane Society in Fernandina Beach, I have found fulfillment. My voluntary work consists in “socializing” the cats of the establishment. In other words, I have carte blanche to visit the cats and kittens, play with them, groom them, whatever, whenever the center is open. Wow, how come I didn’t find out sooner!

Adult cats in the cattery receive toys, different foods, catnip and the company of cat-loving volunteers.

I’ve only been to the facility three times in my new role so far, but that’s all in the first week and I’m already getting to know some of the feline residents and some of the kind humans who make this possible. Most older cats live free in the “cattery”, two large rooms, an air-conditioned indoor room and a large outdoor area protected by a mosquito net. Cats are free to roam between rooms and there are platforms, chairs, boxes, tunnels, litter boxes and water bowls placed throughout the area. Toys of all kinds litter the floor, cat brushes are handy, and cats are given a variety of different brands of cat food and treats to suit their individual tastes. Some chairs are also good for visitors, and if you sit on one too long, you might end up with a cat in your lap, which isn’t a bad thing for me at least.

The cattery’s king cat is Tank, who has been rescued almost daily by longtime volunteers Cindi and Roy Carter, who spent weeks trying to befriend him when he was in the wild. and finally succeeded. Tank has been at the center for so long and has become such a friend of staff and volunteers that the Nassau Humane Society has adopted him as their own, to live out his life in this luxurious setting with people who adore him. Ferdi, another resident of the cattery, could also stay there for a long time. He is blind in one eye, which makes him jump easily when approached unexpectedly, but he also has the somewhat annoying trait of attacking people’s legs. But only to attract more attention. Once someone starts playing with it, swinging a feather on a string or something, it’s ready. This is what our volunteers are for.

Other cats are adopted quickly. During the week I visited, two adult cats were adopted, Millie and Marcus. According to Alec Rowe, the adoption manager, Marcus only lived at the Nassau Humane Society for a week while he was examined by animal care staff. When he was deemed ready to join the cattery cats, he only lasted 40 minutes there before being adopted.

Stephanie Miller, executive director of the Nassau Humane Society shares her office with Gremlin (pictured) and Little Lee.

Other adult cats that cannot associate with others for various reasons are housed in individual extra-large cages (the “condos”). Stephanie Miller, executive director of the Humane Society, also shares her office with a cat or two. She recently housed the elderly Tiger King there in his final days, before dying of age-related issues last week. Tiger had been a long-time resident of the facility, roaming the offices and hallways freely, the “sheriff” of the place, they said. His passing was a sad occasion, but it was lucky for Gremlin and Little Lee, a bonded adult couple, who moved from a condo to his office until they won someone’s heart. other.

And don’t get me started on the kitten room – cuteness overload! About a dozen little kittens are housed in cages here from time to time, but most of the time they roam freely around the room to entertain adoring visitors and potential adopters. Like the main cattery, this room is filled with cat toys and soft areas to sit. Unlike older cats, these little felines love to play and the room is usually filled with happy laughter from those watching their antics. There are few things more enjoyable for me than sitting on a pillow with baby cats in my lap and playing in front of me. Now the number of kittens is dwindling as they too are adopted. And this is a good thing.

Playful kittens entertain adopters and visitors to the Nassau Humane Society.
  • If you’d like to help the Nassau Humane Society, you can volunteer, donate, adopt, or even attend their annual fundraiser, “Pasta for Paws,” taking place October 8th. Check out their website https://nassauhumane.org, call them at 904-321-1647, or stop by the facility on Airport Road during visiting hours beginning at 11 a.m. most days.

And maybe during your visit, you will see me playing with the cats. I can’t stay away!!!!

Pat Foster-Turley, Ph.D., is a zoologist on Amelia Island. It welcomes your questions and observations on nature. patandbucko@yahoo.com

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Miami has a new ordinance to deal with stray and dangerous animals https://klavlav.org/miami-has-a-new-ordinance-to-deal-with-stray-and-dangerous-animals/ Wed, 21 Sep 2022 21:55:51 +0000 https://klavlav.org/miami-has-a-new-ordinance-to-deal-with-stray-and-dangerous-animals/ September 21, 2022 4:45 p.m. Job : September 21, 2022 4:45 p.m. Picture KOAM MIAMI, Okla. – The City of Miami enacts a new ordinance to help manage stray, dangerous or unwanted dogs and cats. City Council approved the new Animal Control Ordinance (Chapter 4) at Monday’s meeting. It includes a “trap, neuter and return” […]]]>
Picture KOAM

MIAMI, Okla. – The City of Miami enacts a new ordinance to help manage stray, dangerous or unwanted dogs and cats.

City Council approved the new Animal Control Ordinance (Chapter 4) at Monday’s meeting. It includes a “trap, neuter and return” policy for stray cats in the community. All dogs and other animals listed in the ordinance brought to the shelter or cared for by Animal Control will be spayed or spayed and vaccinated, unless proof is provided, before being released to owners or proceeding with treatment. ‘adoption.

“We wanted to release this information now to give residents time to prepare for the changes called for in this new ordinance. We are still developing fee schedules, forms and fine-tuning this ordinance as we begin to implement the changes,” Miami City Manager Bo Reese said, “While the prescription is legally active in 30 days, we will slowly introduce them. new measures and work with residents when enforcement begins.

According to the city, the new ordinance gives Animal Control the power to write citations and remove abused animals.

“The City doesn’t own any animals – we don’t own animals. We are here to welcome animals that are harmful, problematic or aggressive to public safety,” said Kevin Browning, Director of Public Works for the City of Miami. “We’re not here to just take care of unwanted animals.”

The following information comes from the City of Miami’s publication of the new ordinance.

All surgical spays and earmolds of community stray cats required by the ordinance will be performed by a licensed veterinarian. An ear swab, or notch of an ear, will be performed on community cats to mark and identify castrated and then released animals.

According to multiple sources, community feral and stray cats have a population of 60 to 200 million nationwide roaming the streets, alleys, buildings and neighborhoods. The city of Miami is no exception with hundreds of cats and kittens roaming the community. Animal rights groups strongly support the trap-neuter-and-return citing the extremely harsh lives of community feral cats dying from cruelty to human animals and diseases caused by cat overpopulation. Feral cats are also responsible for the deaths of billions of birds and mammals across the country, so the policy also has support from wildlife organizations.

Browning said other communities that have adopted such policies and ordinances have seen a reduction of up to 80% in the community’s cat population. Experts say that once 50% of the stray population is neutered, the animal population is better controlled and healthier overall.

While feeding the feral and stray cat population may be done out of good intention and compassion for animals, the new ordinance only allows feeding of community cats in agreement with the Director of Animal Control. According to Animal Control staff, feeding community cats only compounds the problems with feral cat populations.

Exemption certificates

A yearly renewable exemption certificate will be available for a fee to Miami pet and pet owners who wish to waive spaying or neutering their animals, or other measures under the ordinance, such as limiting the number of animals a resident can own, now set at five per residence. Commercial animal establishments located within the city limits, such as kennels, breeders and groomers, will require an annual exemption certificate. The fostering of animals on behalf of the animal shelter and other animal welfare organizations for temporary care is permitted by permit. Certificates will be granted at the discretion of the Miami Animal Control Director. A price list will be fixed by the municipal council.

These exemption certificates do not exempt the person from any nuisance regulations or other applicable restrictions.

The ordinance was created after months of research, discussion, debate and information gathering by the city administration, staff, animal control and city council to find solutions to the growing problem.

“Everyone will say they want litters to have a puppy or a kitten, but what happens to the rest of the litter,” said Maycee Wilkins, Miami animal control manager.

According to Wilkins, the shelter has 30 dog runs and is often filled to capacity. The cattery has about 10 to 20 cats, and Wilkins says she has to turn away five to 15 cats a day.

All reasonable efforts will be made to notify owners of any apprehended animals with microchip identification, wearing tags, or if an owner is known to Animal Control who is being taken to the Miami Ketcher/Keheley Animal Shelter.

The new order will take effect 30 days from September 19, 2022, on October 19, 2022. Sterilization measures for stray animals and animals brought to the shelter will begin at that time. Other parts of the newly enacted Animal Ordinance will be phased in before being more strictly enforced.

“We understand that this is not a solution for everything. We are looking at a period of five to eight years to see a real difference. We are rolling this out slowly and we can adjust as needed,” Browning said.

Overall, the ordinance requires owners to provide the basic care of food, water, shelter, and medical care and/or grooming, if necessary, for all animals and specifically defines them. The ordinance makes it illegal for anyone owning or possessing an animal to subject the animal to cruel, also specifically defined conditions.

Browning said, “We’re going to relax. We don’t knock on doors to see if animals are fixed. We’ve done everything we could imagine, and it’s a work in progress to fix these issues.

Other prescription

The new order will add other measures necessary to enable enforcement by Animal Control, including a provision calling on animal owners to provide adequate shelter for dogs and adequate enclosures for dogs and other farm animals. Tethering is permitted, but only for periods of nine hours in a 24-hour period, allowing for one-hour exercise periods, and no animal should be tethered outside overnight between 11 p.m. 6 a.m., unless a cart is used appropriately. .

Livestock of any species within the city limits is illegal and prohibited unless the property is zoned agricultural or the owner has designated at least one acre of property for raising livestock. The possession of miniature animals as pets in the city is now permitted but limited to two.

No poultry is now allowed within the city limits, except for the ownership of five hens solely for egg production, and no roosters are allowed. An ordinance was also issued regarding slaughter and butchery, with specific guidelines.

Ownership of wildlife or exotic wildlife within city limits has been further defined to include exemptions by following permissions from the USDA, APHIS Wildlife Services, and the US Department of Wildlife Conservation. ‘Oklahoma.

A copy of the new ordinance is available on the City of Miami website. www.miamiokla.net or as an attachment to this press release. (A second press release will be issued on Friday regarding City of Miami Animal Control operations.)

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Chance to Name New Cattery Additions https://klavlav.org/chance-to-name-new-cattery-additions/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 18:05:50 +0000 https://klavlav.org/chance-to-name-new-cattery-additions/ Geelong area residents can pitch their ideas for the name to adorn the newest addition to the GHMBA Stadium. The Kardinia Park Stadium Trust and the State Government are inviting applications for new facility names to be delivered as part of the stadium’s $142 million stage five redevelopment. The names of the stadium’s north stand, […]]]>

Geelong area residents can pitch their ideas for the name to adorn the newest addition to the GHMBA Stadium.

The Kardinia Park Stadium Trust and the State Government are inviting applications for new facility names to be delivered as part of the stadium’s $142 million stage five redevelopment.

The names of the stadium’s north stand, north plaza, two dining destinations, media center and cricket center are all up for grabs as part of the ongoing consultation process.

Kardinia Park Stadium Trust chief executive Gerard Griffin encouraged sports fans in Geelong to have a say in the process.

“We are excited about the progress of the Phase Five redevelopment, and the community currently has the opportunity to get involved in naming key features of the project by visiting the Engage Victoria website.

This redevelopment ensures that Kardinia Park will continue to provide a world-class, multi-purpose sports and event center for generations to come.

A Ford stand and a Fred Flanigan room, as well as the Gary Ablett terrace were demolished to make way for the latest redevelopment.

Legendary Cats figures Reg Hickey and Charles Brownlow have stands named in their honor at Kardinia Park, alongside the Premiership Stand and Players Stand.

To have a say in the new names, Geelong residents can fill out a survey form to submit their suggestions at engage.vic.gov.au/kardinia-park-stage-5

Submissions close September 26.

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All Creatures Big and Small: Can you accommodate Tiddles Cat? https://klavlav.org/all-creatures-big-and-small-can-you-accommodate-tiddles-cat/ Sat, 17 Sep 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/all-creatures-big-and-small-can-you-accommodate-tiddles-cat/ Tiddles is a gray and white domestic shorthair cat born in 2014 who was with All Creatures Great and Small in December 2019. He has shown very little interest in him, although he is an adorable cat who would make a good companion for the right person who could give him the time and love […]]]>

Tiddles is a gray and white domestic shorthair cat born in 2014 who was with All Creatures Great and Small in December 2019.

He has shown very little interest in him, although he is an adorable cat who would make a good companion for the right person who could give him the time and love he needs, while respecting his individuality.

He had been living as a wanderer for over a year. Tiddles is a curious and confident cat who needs an experienced home. Tiddles can be affectionate, but only on his terms and when he fully trusts that person.

Once Tiddles gets to know you, he’s very friendly and likes to make a fuss. He is not afraid to be petted but does not like to be taken. Tiddles loves his food – if you take too long to open the pouch, he’ll clap your hand to tell you to hurry!

Tiddles require a quiet home environment. It is not suitable for living with children under 16 or a home with dogs. Tiddles reacted to other cats in the cattery, but only a few times.

We can’t say for sure if Tiddles could live with another cat, but if the household cat was very quiet, they could potentially be paired up. This should be tested.

Tiddles would make a great companion if given plenty of time, patience, and attention. As Tiddles was a wanderer in the past and was known to wander quite far, he will need a long time to settle in and get used to his new surroundings.

Tiddles must have access to the outdoors and will only be accepted in an experienced cat home – applications from households that have not had a cat before will not be accepted.

To apply for a rehome Tiddles, or any other All Creatures Great and Small cat, visit allcreaturesgreatandsmall.org.uk/rehoming/rehome-a-cat/

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Cost of living crisis affects North Wales animal rescue center https://klavlav.org/cost-of-living-crisis-affects-north-wales-animal-rescue-center/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 08:46:54 +0000 https://klavlav.org/cost-of-living-crisis-affects-north-wales-animal-rescue-center/ Spending hundreds of pounds on a puppy, only to hand it over to an animal rescue center days later, seems unlikely in the midst of a cost of living crisis, but it is a mind-boggling reality. The North Clwyd Animal Rescue (NCAR) team have seen no letup in the need for their services, whether taking […]]]>

Spending hundreds of pounds on a puppy, only to hand it over to an animal rescue center days later, seems unlikely in the midst of a cost of living crisis, but it is a mind-boggling reality.

The North Clwyd Animal Rescue (NCAR) team have seen no letup in the need for their services, whether taking in animals or those interested in adopting pets .

Nicky Owen is head of fundraising at NCAR, and she’s seen many changes at the site, which her parents founded in 1978, and are still active on the site today.

The 36-year-old said: “It’s emotional but rewarding work. Some days are good and some are just awful.

“It’s gratifying when an animal arrives in a terrible way but leaves us for a loving home or we see the animals come back to visit us at one of our open houses.”

Nicky Owen, NCAR’s fundraising manager.

Nicky, who has three dogs and a cat of her own, is puzzled by the current situation of people buying and then giving up animals, adding: “How do they have the money to do this?

“In many cases it’s pedigree puppies, we get French bulldogs, huskies, poodles, you name it, we get it.

“But we’d rather they come to us looking for the right home, than being sold on Facebook or God knows where.”

The center has barely recovered from the ‘pupdemic’ – created during covid, when people on furlough or working from home took in puppies.

Many have been left with the harsh reality of owning a dog once they have had to return to work, and the center has seen a huge boost.

The pandemic has also resulted in many cats not being neutered, which has led to an increase in the number of kittens. Nicky adds that all animals that enter the centre, which has a no-destruction policy, are sterilized.

The Trelogan-based site, near Holywell, currently has around 200 animals in their care, looking for their forever homes – around 70-80 dogs, 100 cats/kittens, 20-30 rabbits and a few guinea pigs.

And while repatriation is their goal, it’s something the team takes very seriously. Nicky explains that often they associate an animal with people, rather than potential adopters when choosing one. Making sure every animal goes to the right home is a priority.

NCAR founder Anne Owen outside the site's veterinary clinic.

NCAR founder Anne Owen outside the site’s veterinary clinic.

Nicky’s mum, Anne Owen, started the charity after a very skinny, pregnant dog appeared in the garden one day. After a visit to the RSPCA, where unfortunately the puppies did not survive, Anne then brought the dog, now called Lady, home.

Things then took off for the animal lover. She said: “They asked me to join the Wrexham RSPCA committee. Then I heard about dogs being abandoned in stray pounds in Flintshire, said we could find kennels where they could go and that I would save them but it could not be offered.

“So I started it myself. We were picking up dogs from pounds and taking them to kennels in Carmel and training them there.

“We then started looking for new premises, which was helped by the money left by a gentleman who had had a cat from us.

“And helping us from the start has been the Jean Sainsbury Animal Welfare Trust.

“We were left with a place in Trefnant, where we started rescuing horses, ponies and donkeys, all things equine.”

Anne is clearly deeply committed. She said: “It’s my life, it’s everything to me. It’s nice to know that our animals are going to good homes.

“But it’s been with the help of so many people that it’s grown, it’s not just me.”

NCAR Kennels, IT and Reception staff member Andy Horton outside the welcoming Doriss Bunker cafe at the Trelogan charity site.

NCAR IT and Reception staff member Andy Horton outside the welcoming cafe Doris’s Bunker at the charity’s Trelogan site.

One of those who play a vital role in the center is Andy Horton.

The 46-year-old has been with the team since 2009 and works mostly in the kennels but also helps with IT, reception “and whatever else is needed”.

He said: ‘We provide stray dog ​​on-call cover for Denbighshire Council, and I’m on staff looking after that.

Andy knows what commitment a dog is. He has a collie he got from NCAR and adds, “He was nine months old when we got him, he’s 14 now. It’s long.

“We’re getting a lot of small, high value dogs right now, and dogs from people who haven’t thought about life after covid, people who just don’t think beyond the cute phase.”

How do the staff prevent themselves from getting too attached to the animals?

Andy said: “There’s always one or two you like best, but it’s about seeing them leave us. You have to toughen up.”

Kennel hand and behaviorist, Steve Owen, with Minnie in an exercise area where dogs can play safely off leash.

Kennel hand and behaviorist, Steve Owen, with Minnie in an exercise area where dogs can play safely off leash.

Getting to know the animals is a big part of the rehabilitation and repatriation process. Steve Owen, dog handler and kennel attendant, plays a very active role.

He has been with NCAR for about 10 years and works primarily with dogs. He learns the behavior of dogs that often come to them with no known background, such as stray dogs.

Steve, 34, said: “We have a range of races, temperaments, ages, diverse backgrounds. We discover them by being with them.

“We have nervous dogs that could use a little more attention, and just need someone to sit down with them to let them know that everything is fine.

“Some have behavioral issues – fear of aggression, aggressive food – some are nervous around other dogs, so we’re working on all of that.”

It is this work with the dogs that allows NCAR to adapt them to their ideal home, with a thorough evaluation of each animal’s behavior.

Steve adds: “It’s never a 9am to 5pm job, you finish when you’re done, you never know what you’re going to face but it’s rewarding to see them go home.”

The nine-year-old, long-haired Maine Coon crosses paths with Tilly at NCAR, who likes to fidget if she's not sleeping, and a personal favorite with community content editor Claire Pierce.

NCAR’s long-haired, nine-year-old Tilly loves to get restless if she’s not sleeping, and she’s a favorite of community content writer Claire Pierce.

It’s not all dogs, of course, with the center housing over 100 cats and kittens.

Cattery manager Sarah Goodwin, who is also a veterinary nurse, often in on-site surgery, and who has worked at NCAR for about five years, takes care of them.

As she walks me through the cattery (and I resist the urge to adopt them all), she explains a bit more about the rehoming process.

Sarah, who has 15 cats at home, said: “Cats are such individuals, some are shy and need quiet homes. Some are more outgoing and would be happier with families.

“You also have to take into account their caution on the road, which they have been used to.

“When they first arrive they are usually very nervous, so we let them settle in. Then we get to know them.

“The same staff work with them every day, get to know their personalities. They are also neutered, vaccinated, flailed and dewormed.

“We want the right homes for them, and when we do, it’s fantastic.”

Sarah, who is also taking in one of the centre’s puppies, echoes the essential role of neutering. She said: “All the time people weren’t having their cats neutered, so kitten season is a nightmare right now.

“People’s cats will have kittens, they will be donated, they won’t be spayed and it’s a vicious circle. We’re being asked to take kittens all the time.”

Repatriation officer and former NCAR volunteer Louise Smith-Jones.

Repatriation officer and former NCAR volunteer Louise Smith-Jones.

Ensuring animals go to the right home is a great philosophy at NCAR, and repatriation officer Louise Smith-Jones plays an important role in making sure that happens.

She said: “As a result of covid we went to the online adoption application process which was much better.

“The adoption process includes a home check, and we can make sure people know what they’re getting into. When they come into the office, I let them talk, and you learn a lot more about their home life. .”

Louise, 53, whose husband is also a volunteer at the centre, started as a volunteer herself about 10 years ago, adds: “It’s about matching the right dog with the right home.

The dedicated team of staff and volunteers help keep the center running, seven days a week. And they are needed. Between walking the dog (most exercise twice a day), laundry (it’s a huge ongoing process), cleaning, veterinary care, feeding, behavioral work, adoption, there is always something to do.

A family of NCAR volunteers with one of the dogs to be walked.

A family of NCAR volunteers with one of the dogs to be walked.

They are also looking for more volunteers, however much time they can dedicate, after seeing their numbers drop due to the pandemic.

They also welcome all donations of blankets, pet bedding, and pet food. For full details please visit ncar.org.uk

If you want to support the association without adopting, you can visit their café, Doris’s Bunker, open from 10:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. They also accept donations at the center between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.

You can also help by raising funds, sponsoring a kennel, or supporting one of the area NCAR charity stores.

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Bracknell plan for the Longcroft Luxury Cat Hotel https://klavlav.org/bracknell-plan-for-the-longcroft-luxury-cat-hotel/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 18:00:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/bracknell-plan-for-the-longcroft-luxury-cat-hotel/ There are plans to build a new cat hotel in Bracknell as cattery numbers have been exhausted during the Covid pandemic. The Longcroft Luxury Cat Hotel is requesting permission to provide “kennel service” to owners requiring short-term accommodation for their cats. The proposed semi-detached property is located on Lower Broadmoor Road, a residential area of […]]]>

There are plans to build a new cat hotel in Bracknell as cattery numbers have been exhausted during the Covid pandemic.

The Longcroft Luxury Cat Hotel is requesting permission to provide “kennel service” to owners requiring short-term accommodation for their cats.

The proposed semi-detached property is located on Lower Broadmoor Road, a residential area of ​​Crowthorne, and would be able to house up to 16 cats in the eight-bedroom hotel.

Founded in 2010 by Abi Purser, the company now has more than 25 Longcroft hotels in operation across the country.

READ MORE: The Bull in Sonning plans to install a garden bar

It claims to operate differently from large-scale catteries that cater to “a large number […] in small environments”, instead the hotel is designed to accommodate “small numbers […] but offering more space”.

The first opened in the Welwyn Garden City Conservation Area, in 2010. In support of this application, Welwyn Hatfield Borough Council Technical Licensing Officer Simon Curling submitted a recommendation.

“It’s a very small operation with minimal impact on residential amenities, in fact if you walked past the premises you would never know a cat hotel was operating there,” he says.

If plans to convert the residential address to a cattery are approved, guests would be required to arrive by appointment only between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m., which can be serviced by the four on-site parking spaces, tours n not being allowed. Sundays or public holidays.

READ MORE: Rose Toop Boatyard in Wargrave, one of the planning sites inspected

The application says that “due to the small scale of the operation” no staff would be needed, but claims the operation would invest £50,000 in the local economy.

The average percentage of UK households owning a cat in 2022 was estimated to be around 28%, according to research by the Pet Food Manufacturers Association (PFMA), up from 18% in 2019.

The 2021 census indicated that the number of households in Bracknell Forest was around 50,000, suggesting that 14,000 households in the borough currently own at least one cat.

Cat ownership increased by more than 4.5 million during the pandemic to around 12 million and, as travel was banned, many catteries closed during this time.

READ MORE: Plan for new Sandhurst homes is ‘unsightly’

There are around 2,000 catteries in the country, four of which operate in the Bracknell area and one is “temporarily closed”.

The Pet Industry Federation (PIF), a professional membership association for UK owners, said Longcroft is an “excellent” example of a business in the sector.

Its chief operating officer, Alexandra Baker, said the PIF “supports their plans” to open new catteries and “recognizes the important role they play” for owners looking for accommodation for their felines when they are absent.

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‘We are full,’ says Lancaster’s Animal Care as it issues an urgent plea for help https://klavlav.org/we-are-full-says-lancasters-animal-care-as-it-issues-an-urgent-plea-for-help/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 12:55:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/we-are-full-says-lancasters-animal-care-as-it-issues-an-urgent-plea-for-help/ The cost of living crisis is impacting many people who are now struggling to meet the costs of keeping a pet. As a result, many animal shelters are seeing an increase in the number of pets seeking rehoming. Animal Care of Blea Tarn Road released a statement this week saying they are now at full […]]]>

The cost of living crisis is impacting many people who are now struggling to meet the costs of keeping a pet.

As a result, many animal shelters are seeing an increase in the number of pets seeking rehoming.

Animal Care of Blea Tarn Road released a statement this week saying they are now at full capacity in all areas.

Lancaster Animal Care has appealed for dog and cat food after reaching maximum occupancy at its Blea Tarn Road home.

“The kennels and cattery are full of animals that need new homes,” they said.

“We get a record number of calls and emails every day from people who need our help, but we just don’t have the space.”

The statement on Facebook went on to say that if you weren’t able to adopt but still wanted to help, there were a number of items they needed.

James’ Beloved Kitten Food

Purina one urinary croquettes

*Lancaster’s Animal Care is entirely self-funded and receives no assistance from the government or anyone else. They raise all of their own money with fundraising events, grant applications, charity shops, and although the team sets up shop at the sanctuary.

Read more

Read more

Here’s when part of the M6 ​​between Lancaster and Preston will close this weekend…

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Central Pa Humane Society seeks foster families | WTAJ https://klavlav.org/central-pa-humane-society-seeks-foster-families-wtaj/ Wed, 07 Sep 2022 17:16:29 +0000 https://klavlav.org/central-pa-humane-society-seeks-foster-families-wtaj/

by: Rebecca Petner, 81Fur is sponsored by Invisible Fence of Central Pa

Job :

Updated:

81Fur is sponsored by Invisible Fence of Central Pa

Studio 814’s Rebecca Petner and Morgan Koziar hold cuddly kittens with Central Pa Humane Society’s Shelby Burns and discuss the importance of foster care.

Hospitality saves lives! The Central PA Humane Society relies heavily on foster homes to help care for the thousands of animals that come to the shelter each year.

One of the challenges that a no-kill shelter like CPHS faces is the lack of space to house the animals. Spring and summer are especially tough during “kitten season” when hundreds of unwanted kittens are born.

The Central PA Humane Society also uses foster homes for stressed animals that do not handle the shelter environment well and need “down time” in a home.

Are you a good candidate to host? Check the following requirements:

Cats/Kittens

  • A room that can be isolated from other rooms in the house (if you are housing pregnant cats/litters of kittens and have pets in your house).
  • Proof of current rabies vaccination for other pets in the household.
  • Proof of FVRCP vaccination for other cats in the household. Vaccination against FeLV is strongly recommended.

Dogs

  • Current rabies evidence for other pets in the home.
  • Proof of DHLPP and Bordetella vaccinations for other dogs in the household.
  • The dogs of the house must come to the shelter and meet the dogs you are looking to foster.

Globally

  • Proof of sterilization for all pets in the home.
  • The CPHS provides all medical care for foster animals.
  • Host families are asked to provide food and bedding. CPHS will provide toys, blankets, bedding and other necessary supplies.

Meet the kittens!

If you can open your heart and home to an animal in need, please complete and submit your foster application.

To welcome dogs, send a request to: info@centralpahumane.org.

To host cats, send an application to: cattery@centralpahumane.org

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Tulare County Animal Services deserves a shout out https://klavlav.org/tulare-county-animal-services-deserves-a-shout-out/ Sun, 28 Aug 2022 03:27:29 +0000 https://klavlav.org/tulare-county-animal-services-deserves-a-shout-out/ Dear Editor, I sit on the Tulare County Animal Services Advisory Committee, and we met in early August to hear updates on the work of the shelter, the stats are staggering and could be the stats of any animal shelter here in the central valley. They are overwhelmed, understaffed and crippled by a gigantic increase […]]]>

Dear Editor,

I sit on the Tulare County Animal Services Advisory Committee, and we met in early August to hear updates on the work of the shelter, the stats are staggering and could be the stats of any animal shelter here in the central valley. They are overwhelmed, understaffed and crippled by a gigantic increase in abandoned animals. Stray animals are arriving at an alarming rate, and people who adopted pets during the pandemic are now unceremoniously abandoning them.

In the county’s 21/22 fiscal year (July 1, 2021 through June 30, 2022), the county shelter received 6,496 calls for animal control officers to respond, which is 1,300 more calls than the county shelter. ‘last year. In July alone, they received 488 animal control calls, broken down with just three officers for all unincorporated areas in Tulare County. So far, animal intakes for the year are 5,036 animals (as of August 1), which is an increase of 1,400 intakes from the previous year. In July alone, the TCAS shelter has taken in 640 animals in June 577 and so far in August 250 in the first 11 days alone. This represents 150 to 180 more animals each month than at the same time last year.

Despite this, County Animal Services Manager Cassie Heffington remained an incredible leader for her facility with an 87% live release rate. This means that less than 13% of all animals entering his shelter are euthanized.

The new County Spay/Neuter Clinic operation at TCAS has been open since October 1, 2021 and has spayed 1,730 cats, 890 dogs and 2 goats. The clinic has also administered over 2,500 vaccinations to help reduce the incidence of parvo, distemper and rabies. The clinic is fortunate to have a driven and caring veterinarian, Dr. Alexandra Myhal, who was previously a large animal vet who does an amazing job with surgeries. Dr. Myhal has worked in food animal medicine, with dairies and a mixed animal practice that brings together his talents well for a busy county shelter that cares for all types of animals. The vet will be off for a few months, so surgeries will be put on hold.

TCAS currently has 15 staff members for the three departments (Field Services, Clinic and Shelter Operations) operating 7 days a week. There are over 110 dogs, 20 cats and 3 roosters at the shelter with another 115 animals in foster homes. TCAS recently added a Foster/Adoption Coordinator named Candace Harrington who is doing a very hard, thankless job of trying to find rescue, foster and adoption for all of these creatures.

The county facility has 40 regular kennels, 10 quarantine kennels, 4 puppy kennels, and a few emergency kennels and pop-up crates in use. They have four banks of stainless steel cat kennels and a small cattery. When wildfires threaten homes and ranches, TCAS must also be equipped to set up a mobile evacuation center and shelter livestock, including horses, cattle, sheep, goats, llamas, alpacas, mini horses, donkeys, poultry and pet dogs and cats. The fire department also takes critical resources away from other responsibilities and requires finding enclosures and a facility to use to keep them.

This is a powerful team that does an enormous amount of work with very little credit, and they receive hundreds of phone calls each month from the public discussing issues of neglect, cruelty, abandonment and harm to children. animals, day after day. They don’t come close to the thanks they deserve.

Just recently I also worked with them to help an elderly woman who had lost her well-being. She had horses to water, and no water for them or for her house. We worked together to set up water tanks and bring them to her property, and thanks to a kind dairy farmer, her tanks were filled the same day with water for her horses and her house. This is a temporary solution, but TCAS and United Way went above and beyond their normal duty to help this person, and I want to thank them both and the dairy farmer who answered my call help.

Tulare County Animal Services is one of the unsung heroes of our county health and human services agency. Everyone wants stray animals contained and dead roadside animals removed, and no one wants nuisance animals roaming free, causing damage to their livestock or property. Just wanted to acknowledge the challenging work done by this small team that has over 4,800 square miles of county roads to cover when the animals are in need.

Donations, foster homes and volunteers are also needed. Although TCAS does not have the staff to run large-scale adoption days, they are open to the public and adoption appointments are welcome. Volunteers and dog walkers and foster homes are always needed! If you want to know more, contact TCAS at 559-636-4050.

Tricia Stever Blattler
Executive Director and Corporate Secretary
Tulare County Agricultural Bureau
Visalia

This letter to the editor is not a news article but the opinion of the author and does not reflect the views of The Sun-Gazette newspaper..

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BITC boss Amanda Mackenzie: Business CAN be a force for good https://klavlav.org/bitc-boss-amanda-mackenzie-business-can-be-a-force-for-good/ Sat, 27 Aug 2022 20:51:10 +0000 https://klavlav.org/bitc-boss-amanda-mackenzie-business-can-be-a-force-for-good/ Proud: Amanda Mackenzie, Head of BITC Amanda Mackenzie wants to convince the world that business can be a force for good, which is never an easy task. Over the past decade, the UK economy has been brought to the brink of ruin by reckless banks. The big oil companies have been accused of polluting the […]]]>

Proud: Amanda Mackenzie, Head of BITC

Amanda Mackenzie wants to convince the world that business can be a force for good, which is never an easy task. Over the past decade, the UK economy has been brought to the brink of ruin by reckless banks.

The big oil companies have been accused of polluting the planet. Water suppliers spent millions of hours dumping sewage into rivers and the sea, and paid big bosses millions as the country suffered from a stifling drought. Consumer goods companies have been criticized for making billions of pounds in profits as customers grapple with runaway inflation.

And for business leaders, accusations of profanity are a professional hazard.

The roadmap is long. But in her nearly six years as chief executive of Business in the Community (BITC), Mackenzie, 58, told a different side of the story.

And despite some of the headlines, she’s adamant there’s another side, and that responsible business can improve people’s lives and help less privileged communities.

“We were involved in leveling before the phrase was coined,” she says. “There is an inextricable link between a healthy business and a healthy community.”

BITC, which celebrates its 40th anniversary this year, is sponsored by the Prince of Wales. It boasts of being the largest and oldest member organization for responsible business. When it was founded in 1982, the country was still traumatized by riots a year earlier in Brixton in south London and Toxteth in Liverpool.

The nation was deeply divided, largely marked by industrial decline, unemployment and poverty. The aim of these early years was to involve business in the regeneration of local communities and to provide practical help for people to set up their own business.

BITC was an early advocate of ideas such as ESG – environment, social and governance – as well as diversity and inclusion. These are now commonplace, but 40 years ago these concepts were considered fringe, bordering on moody.

For Mackenzie, it’s all part of a proud tradition of enlightened capitalism, dating back to companies with Quaker roots like Unilever. “That legacy plays into business today. That’s the essence of what good companies do,” she says.

Reflecting on her time at BITC as she prepares to step down this year, she says, “We had to be stronger and prouder.”

An inevitable danger is that cynics dismiss responsible business as a sign of virtue. With Yorkshirewoman Mackenzie at the helm, it’s a lot grittier than that.

The Seeing is Believing program, launched by the Prince of Wales in 1990, wrests business leaders from the bubble of their boardrooms.

The idea is that executives, who risk being pampered at the top, see for themselves the difficulties faced in some of the less prosperous places in the UK. On a visit this summer to Bradford and surrounding areas, delegates wiped tears from their eyes during a visit to the Keighley Asian Women and Children’s Centre.

The women took turns getting up and telling their stories, sometimes hesitantly. Many had suffered from domestic violence and poverty. Some were unable to speak English. All had found refuge at the center and, armed with newfound confidence, are now working on a business idea to sell lunch curries to workers at local businesses.

“On seeing is believing visits, grown men crying are my measure of success,” Mackenzie says. “It gets people out of their comfort zone into a place where they can apply business thinking to social issues.”

BITC members include big names, such as BP, Barclays, NatWest, Credit Suisse, La Poste and PwC, all of which have come under fire in various scandals in recent years.

One might take a cynical view of this, but for Mackenzie, business needs a purpose, and it “has to be something beyond profit.” She says, “If a business has a purpose that acts like a North Star, it will guide them through difficult times.”

Mackenzie and her team have taken action in the pandemic with the National Business Response Network (NBRN). During Covid, the NBRN used local BITC contacts to ensure business support went where it was needed most, whether it was food, social care or technology. When schools closed and children needed computers to learn from home, Mackenzie explains, “we contacted our network immediately, but due to a national shortage of new devices, we had to be flexible. creativity”.

BITC has partnered with Computers4Charities to receive used devices, erase them and redistribute them. Businesses piled in to help, including Virgin Media, which donated £300,000 and 1,500 laptops and 4G packages.

Other donations included food from the LNER rail company and Manchester Airport that was allegedly wasted, and digital training for staff at technology company Verizon to help women victims of domestic violence.

“In about five weeks, NBRN set up unique supply chains. We knew where the needs were, so we could put the supply chains together,” says Mackenzie.

“It was about our convening power. We were in a unique position because we had a sense of community needs and business connections. We are currently using it to help refugees find work. She also mentions Ban the Box, a program in which companies get rid of the requirement for job applicants to disclose their past criminal records.

“Companies removed that checkbox for a million jobs. Some large employers, like Timpson, employ ex-offenders. They have had their day. Why should they be judged on the worst thing they’ve ever done? It’s not okay.

Mackenzie’s definition of a responsible business is one whose long-term strategy is centered on building healthy communities and a healthy environment. “You have to be fair and sustainable, these are the two watchwords when making decisions. You have to balance that with making a profit, which isn’t easy, but that’s what CEOs get paid for.

The political turmoil of recent years “puts the onus back on business,” she says. “Companies aren’t here for five years, they’re here for the long haul.”

In good company: Amanda Mackenzie with BITC boss the Prince of Wales

In good company: Amanda Mackenzie with BITC boss the Prince of Wales

No one could accuse Mackenzie of being a naive benefactor. She is a seasoned executive, having served as director of marketing and communications at insurance giant Aviva, where she was seconded to help launch the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals.

She has also held senior positions at British Airways, BT, Hewlett-Packard and British Gas, and was a leading figure in Lord (Mervyn) Davies’s investigation to increase the number of women on company boards. administration of FTSE.

She is also an independent director of Lloyds Banking Group.

Under his leadership, BITC is not just another talk shop, but gets things done. “I describe us as a ‘reservoir of thought and action’.”

So, as a hard-headed businesswoman, does she see any limits to social responsibility? “Yeah, if the long-term financial viability of this business is hampered by prioritizing one stakeholder group over another, then I guess that’s the limit.”

Mackenzie says she struggles with executives accepting very large salaries and whether that can be considered consistent with responsible business practices. “The program we are pursuing is not about compensation. It is a complex area. But do I feel good when I hear about excessive compensation? No, of course not.

BITC, she says, would turn down socially irresponsible companies that try to join, and reject those that failed, “although we haven’t made a big song and dance about it.”

Good intentions don’t go far, but Amanda Mackenzie brought her insight and energy to her role at BITC. Membership has increased by 30% over the past two years after an earlier decline, and revenues have stabilized. The “net promoter score” – a measure of how well an organization is viewed by its customers – rose from minus 7 in 2017 to plus 41 in 2022.

Responsible companies, she argues, often perform better.

“When business leaders engage with society, it brings their brains to the fore in communities. It is a priceless alchemical moment.

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