Boarding catteries – Klavlav http://klavlav.org/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 09:40:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://klavlav.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/klav-150x150.png Boarding catteries – Klavlav http://klavlav.org/ 32 32 A family tribute to a well-known figure in Herefordshire agriculture https://klavlav.org/a-family-tribute-to-a-well-known-figure-in-herefordshire-agriculture/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 08:30:41 +0000 https://klavlav.org/a-family-tribute-to-a-well-known-figure-in-herefordshire-agriculture/ The family of a highly respected and beloved figure in the farming community of Herefordshire and Worcestershire paid their respects after his death. New to Bromyard, Allan Jenkins was arguably the best known in hop picking, helping to design a machine that was exported around the world. He was born in 1927 in Sutton St […]]]>

The family of a highly respected and beloved figure in the farming community of Herefordshire and Worcestershire paid their respects after his death.

New to Bromyard, Allan Jenkins was arguably the best known in hop picking, helping to design a machine that was exported around the world.

He was born in 1927 in Sutton St Nicolas, near Hereford, to his postman father and sharecropping mother’s family in Hindlip, Worcester. His family said it was a time gone by when life was simple and, for children, idyllic.

Allan and his older sister Joyce walked three miles across fields to the village school where children aged 5 to 14 were divided into two classrooms.

On their daily walks to school, Allan and his sister clapped their hands to scare away the rabbits, picked wild strawberries, blackberries, hazelnuts and sorrel from the stream.

Allan, from an early age, was always interested in machinery and would run away to investigate the latest horse-drawn farm implement, which got the two kids in trouble because they were late for tea.

In 1935 the Jenkins family moved to Norton, the home of the Worcestershire Regiment where his grandparents had taken over running another farm.

Later he attended school in Kempsey and frequently remembered learning to swim in the Severn near the new road bridge.

Allan Jenkins learned to ride when his family moved to Norton, Worceter

Upon leaving school, Allan moved to Worcester Technical College. There he studied drawing techniques and gained knowledge of engineering and mathematics.

He always loved math and his children remember that it was impossible for him to understand logarithms, trigonometry and the use of a slide rule.

Allan’s first job was with Heenan and Froude, the well-known engineering company in Worcester, where he apprenticed as a draftsman.

His passion was aviation and it continued throughout his life. He would have loved to join the RAF but his job testing aircraft engines kept him from doing so. He became an enthusiastic member of the Royal Observer Corps

His family said he was also an avid and accomplished motorcycle scrambler, winning numerous trophies. He was approached by BSA motorcycles to become their team rider but turned down the offer. He also owned a classic Morgan car.

Ledbury Reporter: Allan Jenkin was also a motorcycle enthusiastAllan Jenkin was also a motorcycle enthusiast

In the late 1950s, Allan’s engineering and drafting skills were spotted by Albert Brooks of Bruff Engineering, Suckley. Allan was hired by Albert to run the drawing office.

The hop-picking machine designed by Bruff had largely taken over from the early machines designed by McConnell Hinds. Allan and Albert Brooks got along well, his family said.

During the picking season, Allan worked on machine maintenance and consulted closely with Albert Brooks on how the machines could be improved and any problems corrected.

Their combined thoughts would be put on the drawing board and changes made for next season.

Allan became one of the great figures of the hop-growing era, particularly in the Frome Valley, on hand to ensure repairs were carried out quickly.

Allan has also been involved in exporting machinery, to Europe and the United States. He took one to California, but alas no more machines were purchased by the Americans as they incorporated much of Bruff’s design and produced their own.

His family said there are still Bruff machines in use in Australia and New Zealand today.

They said he was a good salesman, had an easy-going character, and would take potential buyers of the Bruff machine to nearby farms during picking season.

One of the main customers was Guinness Hop Farms, in Bransford and Kent.

Eventually Allan saw that his time at Bruff was coming to a natural conclusion and he spotted the gap in the market for a building construction company.

Mark Capper of Stocks Farm, whose hop-picking machine had been maintained by Allan, generously allowed him to use an old blacksmith’s forge for steelmaking and thus started a very successful small business – Alvia Developments.

Many barns, cowsheds, hop-picking machine buildings built in the 60s and 70s were built by Allan and his small team.

Eventually the company needed larger premises, and Allan and his wife purchased a small farmhouse at Stanford Bishop, undertaking a major renovation of the house and building a purpose-built facility for steel preparation.

Here Allan was able to indulge his childhood passion for farming, calf herding and haymaking and Allan and his wife hosted many charity events at their home.

In the mid-1980s, Allan’s health deteriorated and he decided to close the business and open a boarding house for small dogs.

Allan Jenkins retired to Bromyard in 1997 where he continued to support his wife Sylvia

Allan Jenkins retired to Bromyard in 1997 where he continued to support his wife Sylvia

He then retired in 1997 and moved to Bromyard where he spent his final years supporting his wife Sylvia in her continued charity work. He died aged 94 in January.

“Beloved husband of Sylvia, beloved father of Sandra and Nettie, grandfather of five, great-grandfather of two,” read a family announcement in the Hereford Times.

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Kennel prices add hundreds of dollars to holiday costs https://klavlav.org/kennel-prices-add-hundreds-of-dollars-to-holiday-costs/ Sun, 19 Jun 2022 20:48:35 +0000 https://klavlav.org/kennel-prices-add-hundreds-of-dollars-to-holiday-costs/ A drastic rise in kennel boarding prices is forcing pet owners to shell out hundreds of extra euros on the price of their summer vacation. Lack of space in kennels is also causing concern, leading the Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to urge owners to be careful about where they send […]]]>

A drastic rise in kennel boarding prices is forcing pet owners to shell out hundreds of extra euros on the price of their summer vacation.

Lack of space in kennels is also causing concern, leading the Dublin Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals to urge owners to be careful about where they send their animals.

DSPCA spokeswoman Gillian Bird said Extra.ie: ‘If you book a family holiday for you, your husband and your two children, the cost of a flight has increased, the cost of accommodation has increased, generally the cost of living has increased.

Ms Bird explained that until recently daily costs for a dog kennel were closer to £20 a day, but have now risen by a third to a fifth. Photo: Brighton Dog Photography/Getty

‘On top of that you’re probably looking at paying €25 to €30 [a day] for your dog to be boarded. If you leave for 10 days, you must leave your dog the day before and pick it up the day after your return. That’s 12 days at €25 to €30 per day on top of your own family vacation.

Many owners have more than one dog, adding significantly to the already substantial costs of family vacations.

We researched the price of boarding for two dogs at kennels in Dublin City and Co Dublin and they all charged €50 per day which added significantly to the cost of the holiday.

Kennel vacation rates
DSPCA spokeswoman Gillian Bird fears this risks leaving pets alone in case owners are unable to meet kennel fees. Photo: Shutterstock

Ms Bird said staff and insurance costs, as well as electricity prices, had all driven up boarding prices. She also expressed concern for the safety of pets in crowded kennels. “There is only a limited number of dogs a kennel should accommodate, depending on the number of staff and the facilities they have.

“So people have to keep that in mind, that they have to be careful if they’re sending their pets to the right place, somewhere that’s going to take good care of their animals and not let anything happen to them. during their absence. ‘

Ms Bird explained that until recently daily costs for a dog kennel were closer to £20 a day, but have now risen by a third to a fifth.

Dog kennel prices

And she fears it could leave pets alone in case owners are unable to cover kennel fees.

“Potentially yes…and you abandon your pet if you leave it alone for a period of time and it’s unsafe to do so because you don’t think about what might happen to your pet. It is illegal, absolutely,” she said.

“If you have someone who says they can’t afford to keep their dog because they’re going on vacation and they can’t afford dog boarding, you kind of have to look at the people’s priorities.

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Immingham kennel could be days away from closing without urgent help https://klavlav.org/immingham-kennel-could-be-days-away-from-closing-without-urgent-help/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/immingham-kennel-could-be-days-away-from-closing-without-urgent-help/ A local dog boarding and placement center may be days away from having to shut down if they don’t get help quickly. Immingham Boarding Kennels and Rehoming, in South Killingholme, is struggling to make ends meet with adoptions at an all-time high. The kennel is part of the charity Amicii which has been welcoming dogs […]]]>

A local dog boarding and placement center may be days away from having to shut down if they don’t get help quickly.

Immingham Boarding Kennels and Rehoming, in South Killingholme, is struggling to make ends meet with adoptions at an all-time high. The kennel is part of the charity Amicii which has been welcoming dogs since 2014 and has been operating in our area since 2019.

Moving to the area meant the center had to overcome the reputation of previous owners, Four Paws, but by working hard the team feel they have created a successful venue. The center is relying on adoption fees to keep it running, but with that drying up they might not even be able to pay next month’s kennel bills.

Read more: Shock over discovery of human skull in Lincolnshire pond

While the team is grateful for the help and food donations, they urge the public to donate as much as they can to maintain this invaluable asset. Manager Kelly Magee says she’s never seen anything like it.



Kelly Magee with Lily at Immingham Boarding Kennels and Rehoming

She said: “Adoptions are at an all time low, it’s unreal. Without these fees we can’t function and we struggle to keep going. We have so much to pay here, it’s not just food and We have to pay for air conditioning, cleaning, everything… While the food coming in is a huge help, we could really do with people giving money to keep us open.

“I’ve never been in this position before, it makes me very stressed. Next month we can’t even afford to pay our kennel bills, things are so bad. We also have beautiful dogs here, but they cost us a lot.”

Kelly and the team recently battled a Doberman called Boris who had just six minutes to live when they decided to rescue him, but he has since cost the center over £1,000 in vet bills. Unfortunately, that’s just not viable with a lack of money.



Kelly Magee with Lily at Immingham Boarding Kennels and Rehoming
Kelly Magee with Lily at Immingham Boarding Kennels and Rehoming

Kelly said she wants these animals to have happy lives and by keeping the kennels open she can make that happen. She said: “I want them to have a good home. It was never about the money for us, we wouldn’t be doing what we’re doing if it was.

“It’s about being able to find the right home for a dog that hasn’t had a great life. If people could put together a standing order as much as they can afford, that would be amazing. Absolutely all of us would help right now.”

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Buxton RSPCA invites dog owners to take part in the fun show at Pavilion Gardens https://klavlav.org/buxton-rspca-invites-dog-owners-to-take-part-in-the-fun-show-at-pavilion-gardens/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 11:23:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/buxton-rspca-invites-dog-owners-to-take-part-in-the-fun-show-at-pavilion-gardens/ A fun day out on Saturday, June 18, will see over 40 animal-themed family events taking place simultaneously across the country. In Buxton, from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., there will be stalls, a raffle and raffle, face painting and other children’s entertainment, pet advice sessions, as well as the ten informal competition classes and […]]]>

A fun day out on Saturday, June 18, will see over 40 animal-themed family events taking place simultaneously across the country.

In Buxton, from 12:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m., there will be stalls, a raffle and raffle, face painting and other children’s entertainment, pet advice sessions, as well as the ten informal competition classes and a agility course open to all ages. little.

Brenda Scott, local volunteer fundraising co-ordinator, said: “This is a day to unite all branches of the RSPCA and we are doing our part. It’s really the first time that we have been able to come back there trying to raise funds.

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Could your dog get his paws on a prize at the RSPCA dog show in the pavilion gardens?

“We have held virtual dog shows during the pandemic which have been quite successful, but there has been an impact on our finances which has required us to cut back on some things. Fingers crossed, we are back on track now.

Read more

Read more

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She added: “Unlike some branches which are inspector-run and have their own facilities, we are completely volunteer-run and focused on rehabilitation and re-housing. We currently have dogs in boarding houses, cats and other small furry animals in shelters as well, and we need to fundraise to pay for that.

“All proceeds from the show will go directly to our branch for the animals in our care, either to receive treatment or to find new homes, and to help members of the public who may be having problems with their animals. of company.”

The show will be a relaxed affair with categories including ‘waggiest tail’, ‘best paw shaker’, ‘pretties puppy’ and ‘golden oldie’ – judging will take place from 1-1.30pm and 2.30-3pm, with agility section in between.

There will also be a parade of some of the dogs the branch is currently seeking new homes for.

Brenda said: “Entry is £2 per class but people can come and enjoy the show for free. Even if you don’t think your dog is fit for competition, he can watch too.

The branch will be hosting another fun dog show in Chelmorton on Saturday July 2nd.

In these confusing and worrying times, local journalism is more vital than ever. Thank you to everyone who helps us ask the questions that matter. take out a subscription or buy a newspaper. We are all struggling together.– Louise Cooper, editor.

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‘It’s all about dogs’: The devil is in the details… Small towns fight to ‘protect and serve’ citizens’ dogs https://klavlav.org/its-all-about-dogs-the-devil-is-in-the-details-small-towns-fight-to-protect-and-serve-citizens-dogs/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 05:15:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/its-all-about-dogs-the-devil-is-in-the-details-small-towns-fight-to-protect-and-serve-citizens-dogs/ Welcome to your new home Natural, environmentally friendly, “air conditioning” Indestructible insulation mats are easily disinfected The road to hell is paved with good intentions All dogs go to heaven. Too many people have to go through Hell to get there. The road to this hell is paved with good intentions. — “It’s all about […]]]>

Welcome to your new home

Natural, environmentally friendly, “air conditioning”

Indestructible insulation mats are easily disinfected

The road to hell is paved with good intentions

All dogs go to heaven. Too many people have to go through Hell to get there. The road to this hell is paved with good intentions.

— “It’s all about dogs.”

BELLAIRE, Texas, USA, June 16, 2022 /EINPresswire.com/ — With renewed fervor over the past two years, city officials in Bellaire, TX, have faced growing public outcry over conditions at the local pound. During this same period, external and internal factors exacerbated the challenges posed by a decrepit structure of unknown age. Beyond the obvious complications presented by Covid, a new police chief was hired, a new regime at city hall was elected and the officer of the year (who happened to be the traffic control officer animals) has been transferred although no replacement is available.

Bellaire and its adjacent small towns represent the wealthiest municipalities in the megalopolis of Houston. Uniquely, money has never been a substantive issue, regarding utilities or capital improvements in these ZIP Codes. Contact any other City Hall department or staff and enjoy service levels that exceed those of most 5* hotels. But despite the best efforts of the police department, which is tasked with overseeing animal control, a 5-room doghouse that handles something less than 100 puppies a year may not be a high priority. The city limits of Houston are only a mile or two away in any direction…with such close proximity to a major city, big city problems are right next door.

Likewise, the municipal Council faces the endless and Herculean tasks of flood control in an area that Mother Nature will regularly inundate. “The man plans and she laughs.” Weeks before the summer solstice, temperatures can reach 100 degrees for just as long.

Plus, with the wealth of this small town, comes the onslaught of commercial development. Per capita and for its size, few other communities have so many zoning issues where $2 million McMansions share a fence line with a proposed fast-food drive-thru or a 10-story office building. The zoning board and the municipal council are regularly overwhelmed.

So, despite the well-meaning efforts of the City Fathers, the Pound Hounds only get leftovers from the conference table.

A new animal control officer was hired about three months ago. In all honesty, two or three years of experience as one of the other five qualified her for on-the-job training in a much less demanding position in a much smaller town. She is certified to perform several routine tests and inoculation procedures. She shows sincere concern for her charges.

To be equally fair, she can’t necessarily be expected to know how to properly sanitize a kennel or readily accept more effective concepts outside the box of her experience. This education will surely come with time.

Meanwhile, the measures that well-meaning lay volunteers had initiated over the past few months remain in place, despite the negative impact on the residents of the Pound. Electric fans create a convection effect in the tiny, cramped enclosures. Power cords pose a fire and shock hazard unless they have been inspected by a government agency within the past 10 years.

Children’s paddling pools may seem like fun for humans, but terrified and confused strays may not be so eager to bathe. Additionally, the potential exchange of organic or skin diseases among anonymous K-9s can be dangerous, even deadly. When these pools are left overnight, for three rainy days, or over the weekend, the standing water is a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Mosquitoes are the primary vector of heartworms, which are the leading cause of shortened lifespans, exorbitant medical bills, and death in dogs.

A simple, systemic and sustainable solution – as encouraged by the citizen movement, “It’s all about dogs”. – is the establishment of a “sir”. This glorified garden hose (at a cost of less than $100) creates a “curtain” of very small water droplets outside the kennel. The moisture essentially evaporates immediately and produces a temperature drop of over 20 degrees. Any idiot with a screwdriver can install them in less than an hour. They do not require any power supply and the water supply can be regulated by a timer.

Currently, inmates can stand on concrete in their confined space for 22 hours a day. Concrete is a very effective conductor of heat – a very poor insulator, reaching up to 130 degrees when the air temperature is 95. Indestructible, padded martial arts mats are very effective insulators and can be disinfected more effectively than porous materials such as concrete or brick. The cost would again be less than $100, but again citizens are eager to donate it. There is no “setting up”. These are rugs.

Wooden pallets (or even milk crates) are available on request. If necessary, they can be attached together effortlessly. Raised retreat provides escape from occasional minor flooding and blistered concrete.

Citizens (“It’s All About Dogs”) took those early suggestions directly to individual city council members, the chief of police, the new animal control officer, and the public, via a series of bi-monthly council meetings. It was only last week that these citizens discovered that their “innovative ideas” had long been championed, endorsed and implemented by the ASPCA, AKC, professional kennels and numerous veterinarians (including one is nationally recognized, published and quoted on the police department’s own web page).

The public outcry continues, but even the most active activists appreciate that the wheels of government are turning slowly. They are confident that a decision maker will “do the right thing”… eventually – hopefully – before another of their proteges suffers needlessly or another dies,

“It’s all about dogs.”

mike stanton
“It’s all about dogs.”
+1 832-799-9427
write to us here
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Maternity for heartworms and the transfer of other diseases

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Cruel Pet Owner Punched Puppy In The Face And Left Him Walking In Front Of A Train https://klavlav.org/cruel-pet-owner-punched-puppy-in-the-face-and-left-him-walking-in-front-of-a-train/ Sat, 11 Jun 2022 15:48:49 +0000 https://klavlav.org/cruel-pet-owner-punched-puppy-in-the-face-and-left-him-walking-in-front-of-a-train/ A cruel pet owner has been banned from keeping animals for 20 years after he punched his dog in the face and left it hit by a train. Cameron Casson let her dog walk off-leash at a Lancashire train station and she was hit by a slow-moving train. The pup, named Cali, was just ten […]]]>

A cruel pet owner has been banned from keeping animals for 20 years after he punched his dog in the face and left it hit by a train. Cameron Casson let her dog walk off-leash at a Lancashire train station and she was hit by a slow-moving train.

The pup, named Cali, was just ten months old when she was injured at Bane Lane Station near Morecambe on July 19 last year. Casson was handed an eight-week prison sentence suspended for 12 months after the court heard details of how the Staffordshire Bull Terrier was injured.

A witness who was on the station platform reported seeing Casson punch Cali, who was later picked up by a dog sitter and taken to a vet in Lancaster where she was treated for back and tail injuries , as well as bruises around his eye. The vet also found evidence that Cali’s fur was contaminated with oil, LancsLive reports.

READ MORE : Prisoner squirted officers with urine bottle in ‘gross and heinous attack’

The RSPCA launched an investigation and Casson, 22, of Cross Gill, Rylands, Lancaster, admitted two charges of causing the dog unnecessary suffering and one of failing to ensure Cali’s needs were met. He appeared at Blackburn Magistrates’ Court for sentencing on May 24.

In a statement to the court, an eyewitness said she held the dog, which was without a collar or leash, on the platform and brought it back to Casson. Later, she spotted him yelling and swearing at the puppy. She said Casson attempted to tie a sweater around the dog’s neck to “use it as a leash.”

She continued: “The dog seemed reluctant to follow him, so he grabbed the dog by the scruff of the neck and attempted to drag her along the station platform.”

A second eyewitness said he saw Cali being punched in the face and head three or four times with “hard force”. The dog was found hours later on a public footpath in Hest Bank.



Cali

In an expert report to the court, veterinarian Dr Sean Taylor said the dog’s lacerations and oil contamination were consistent with her being hit by a slow moving train. X-rays showed two bilateral rib fractures, which the surgeon believes were suffered in mid to late June 2021. The accused had claimed he did not know how they could have been caused, except starts with the dog “falling from a rope swing”.

Dr Taylor concluded: “The rib fractures indicate that Cali suffered high force focal blunt trauma to both sides of the chest.

“Although they did not occur on July 19, it is highly likely that these injuries were due to physical abuse considering the defendant’s lack of a reasonable explanation as to how these broken bones could have happened accidentally.”



Cali

RSPCA inspector Amy McIntosh said in her witness statement that Casson admitted to slapping her dog for trying to get back on the train. The inspector said he told her, “You can’t do this for slapping a dog.”

She continued: “The dog got off the train with him and then got back up and he chased the dog and he ended up on the tracks.”

The court heard that Casson suffered from mental health issues and lacked maturity. He was also told to pay a victim surcharge of £128. Since her ordeal, Cali has been cared for in boarding kennels. Staff will soon find their loving new owners there, the court was told.

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Man gets pet ban for 20 years after Staffy was hit by slow train at station https://klavlav.org/man-gets-pet-ban-for-20-years-after-staffy-was-hit-by-slow-train-at-station/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 13:42:25 +0000 https://klavlav.org/man-gets-pet-ban-for-20-years-after-staffy-was-hit-by-slow-train-at-station/ A man who let his dog roam off-leash at a train station where she was hit by a slow train has been banned from keeping animals for 20 years. Cameron Casson was also handed an eight-week prison sentence suspended for 12 months after a court heard how his 10-month-old Staffordshire Bull Terrier was injured in […]]]>

A man who let his dog roam off-leash at a train station where she was hit by a slow train has been banned from keeping animals for 20 years.

Cameron Casson was also handed an eight-week prison sentence suspended for 12 months after a court heard how his 10-month-old Staffordshire Bull Terrier was injured in the incident at Bare station Lane, near Morecambe, on July 19 last year.

It was also discovered that the dog, called Cali, had suffered broken ribs in the previous month, for which Casson had not sought veterinary attention.

On the station platform, an eyewitness reported seeing the accused hitting his pet.

She was later picked up by a dog sitter and taken to a vet in Lancaster, where she was treated for injuries to her back and tail and bruises around her eye. There was also evidence that his fur was contaminated with oil.

The RSPCA launched an investigation and Casson, 22, of Cross Gill, Rylands, Lancaster, admitted two charges of causing the dog unnecessary suffering and one of failing to ensure the animal’s needs were satisfied and appeared at Blackburn Magistrates Court to be sentenced on May 24.

In a court statement, an eyewitness said she held the dog, which had no collar or leash, on the platform and returned it to the owner.

But later she spotted him yelling and insulting his pet.

She said Casson tried to tie a jumper around the dog’s neck to “use it as a leash.”

She said: “The dog seemed reluctant to follow him, so he grabbed the dog by the scruff of the neck and tried to drag her along the station platform.”

Lancashire Telegraph:

Another eyewitness said he saw the dog punched in the face and head three or four times with “force”.

Cali was found hours later on a public footpath in Hest Bank.

In his expert report, veterinarian Dr Sean Taylor said the dog’s lacerations and oil contamination were consistent with her being hit by a slow moving train.

X-rays showed two bilateral rib fractures, which the surgeon said were suffered in mid to late June 2021.

The defendant had claimed he did not know how they could have been caused, other than the dog “falling off a swing”.

Lancashire Telegraph:

Dr Taylor concluded: “The rib fractures indicate that Cali suffered high force focal blunt trauma to both sides of the chest.

“Although they did not occur on July 19, it is highly likely that these injuries were due to physical abuse considering the defendant’s lack of a reasonable explanation as to how these broken bones could have happened accidentally.”

RSPCA inspector Amy McIntosh said in her witness statement that Casson admitted to slapping her dog for trying to get back on the train.

The inspector said he told her, “You can’t do now for slapping a dog.”

She said: “The dog got off the train with him and then got back up and he chased the dog and he ended up on the tracks.”

As a mitigation, the court was told that Casson suffered from mental health issues and lacked maturity.

He was also told to pay a victim surcharge of £128.

Since her ordeal, Cali has made leaps and bounds in caring for kennels whose staff will soon find their loving new owners.

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Can a New York State veterinarian retain a pet for non-payment? https://klavlav.org/can-a-new-york-state-veterinarian-retain-a-pet-for-non-payment/ Thu, 09 Jun 2022 04:05:50 +0000 https://klavlav.org/can-a-new-york-state-veterinarian-retain-a-pet-for-non-payment/ Imagine having to take your pet to the vet for an emergency, which is scary in itself, but then you realize you really don’t have the money to pay for it. Any pet owner would rush their pet without worrying about being able to pay, right? But could it cost you your pet? Regardless of […]]]>

Imagine having to take your pet to the vet for an emergency, which is scary in itself, but then you realize you really don’t have the money to pay for it. Any pet owner would rush their pet without worrying about being able to pay, right? But could it cost you your pet? Regardless of the magnitude of our needs, we live in a capitalist society, so the bills have to be paid.

Photo by Karlo Tottoc on Unsplash

Photo by Karlo Tottoc on Unsplash

Pet owners consider their pets part of their family, but unfortunately they don’t have exactly the same rights as humans. Although New York State has laws in place to protect animals, unlike some less developed states, they are still considered property in many cases.

According to New York State Veterinary Medical Society board attorney Barbara Ahern, Esq., the answer is YES:

A veterinarian who has rendered veterinary services to an animal and has not been paid can use the provisions established in the Liens Act to establish a lien on the animal and then sell the animal for payment of the debt due.

The exact law is a bit longer, but here’s what New York Link Law Sec. 183 says a vet has the legal right to do anything in New York State, if you don’t pay your bill,

Photo by Artem Makarov on Unsplash

Photo by Artem Makarov on Unsplash

Any veterinarian, duly licensed to practice under the laws of this State, who, in the course of such practice, renders professional services in the treatment of any dog, cat or other domestic animal or manages such an animal on its premises , or a person keeping a boarding stable or a boarding stable for animals, or who grazes or harbors one or more animals, or who in this respect keeps or stores a wagon, truck, cart, car , vehicle or harness, has a lien dependent on the possession of every dog, cat or other animal which he keeps, grazes or lodges, and on any wagon, truck, cart, automobile, vehicle or harness, of whatever nature or description, stored or kept on condition that an express or implied agreement is made with the owners thereof, whether such owner is a mortgagor retained in possession or otherwise, of the sum due to him for the service rendered professional, so in, keeping, boarding or grazing of the animal, or for the keeping or storage of any wagon, truck, cart, automobile, vehicle and harness, under the agreement, and may detain the dog, cat or other animal or wagon, truck, cart, wagon, vehicle and harness accordingly, until such sum is paid.

The law does not only apply to veterinarians, it also includes kennels or daycares. According to the New York City Bar Association Committee on Animal Legal Issues,

Under New York law, a vet/kennel has what is called a possessory lien on an animal for the cost of care. Thus, the veterinarian/boarding school may refuse to return an animal in its possession until payment of the bill for care and treatment.

If after a while you still haven’t paid the bill and the veterinarian or kennel has possession of your pet, they may place your pet in the custody of the Center for Animal Care and Control, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, or another human society.

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New York State’s official dog, which was adopted in 2015, is not a specific breed, but rather a profession by law,

“The working dog is the official dog of the

State. For the purposes of this section, “working dog” means (see specific professions below):”

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Wagglebottoms Muncie IN missing dog https://klavlav.org/wagglebottoms-muncie-in-missing-dog/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 18:46:03 +0000 https://klavlav.org/wagglebottoms-muncie-in-missing-dog/ MUNCIE, Ind. – Melissa Davis and Patrick Carroll thought their trip to West Virginia was going to be good. That is until they get a call from Lauren, owner of Wagglebottoms, a pet boarding house in Muncie, telling them that their nine-month-old purebred boxer, Harley, is missing. The couple dropped Harley off at Wagglebottoms around […]]]>

MUNCIE, Ind. – Melissa Davis and Patrick Carroll thought their trip to West Virginia was going to be good. That is until they get a call from Lauren, owner of Wagglebottoms, a pet boarding house in Muncie, telling them that their nine-month-old purebred boxer, Harley, is missing.

The couple dropped Harley off at Wagglebottoms around 2.40pm on Wednesday before setting off on their trip down south. 8:30 a.m. the next morning, Lauren called Davis saying Harley was nowhere to be found. “Lauren was just as stunned as I was,” Davis said.

Davis and Carroll’s immediate thought when they got the call was “How did this happen?” and “Maybe it was stolen?”. “Harley is an unsterilized purebred boxer puppy. I’m sure she’s worth a lot. He was an expensive dog,” Davis said.

The couple said they were grateful for the commitment of Lauren, Muncie PD and the community of Muncie in finding Harley. “I don’t want to say anything negative about Wagglebottoms right now, I’m just praying she’s taken today,” Davis said.

There is currently an active police investigation with Muncie PD. After inspecting the area, police found no evidence of Harley fleeing in the middle of the night. Doors, kennels and windows were all locked. After seeing the Facebook post about Harley’s disappearance the man who put up the fencing at Wagglebottoms even headed over there to make sure everything was secure and there were no ‘weak spots’ in the fencing.

There were none. Ironically, the cameras on the property weren’t working that night, with the exception of the front door camera, however, footage did not capture Harley’s whereabouts.

The online response to Davis’ post and Wagglebottoms’ post has been both overwhelmingly positive and sadly overwhelmingly negative. As one dog owner hopes, many Muncie residents have offered to help find Harley in some way. On the other hand, owner Lauren and Wagglebottoms as a whole received a lot of flak for this incident.

Davis said a lot of people comment on their “previous bad experiences” at Wagglebottoms. Some even threatened the owner Lauren with death.

“Lauren is getting death threats. She sent me screenshots of some of the comments on the Facebook post“, Davis said. “If I had known all this, I would not have taken her there. In the same breath, I am grateful that Lauren is leading this, “said Davis.

After contacting Lauren, she told us that she and her team are doing everything they can to bring Harley home. Lauren said she had been at the facility for about 36 straight hours trying to get Harley back to safety. “She’s a good dog and she deserves to be back with her family,” Lauren said.

Davis and Carroll are scheduled to return Sunday from their trip to West Virginia. The two hope Harley will be safe in their arms then.

“I am frustrated, heartbroken, devastated, worried. She’s so sweet and she’s our baby,” Davis said.

“I don’t think I will ever see a dog again.”

If you or anyone else you know has seen Harley, you are urged to call Officer Jamie Brown with Muncie PD at 765-216-2850.

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NEWSPORT DAILY-Mayor Kerr backs Animal Welfare Act amendments https://klavlav.org/newsport-daily-mayor-kerr-backs-animal-welfare-act-amendments/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 00:00:00 +0000 https://klavlav.org/newsport-daily-mayor-kerr-backs-animal-welfare-act-amendments/ Budget cuts impact pet safety and welfare Mr. Kerr also commented on how the budget limits the ability to protect abused animals. “While the staff involved in this area always do their best, they struggle with limited budgets and laws that often put owners’ rights ahead of animal welfare. “We currently have an RSPCA inspector […]]]>

Budget cuts impact pet safety and welfare

Mr. Kerr also commented on how the budget limits the ability to protect abused animals.

“While the staff involved in this area always do their best, they struggle with limited budgets and laws that often put owners’ rights ahead of animal welfare.

“We currently have an RSPCA inspector who covers from Cairns south to Cape Town and is often limited in what he can attend. By-law officers regularly step in to help, but have only limited powers when it comes to dealing with animal welfare on private property.

“In many cases, even the RSPCA is limited in its ability to act quickly for the benefit of the animals if the owner appears to be in compliance and has the ability to do the right thing.

“I hope that during the review, additional powers will be given to RSPCA and Statute officers.”

“Unless funding is increased so that these cases can be properly monitored, investigated and prosecuted, nothing will ever change in the region.”

RSPCA stands for enhanced animal welfare

RSPCA Queensland CEO Darren Maier also commented on his hopes for this review period.

“The Animal Care and Protection Act is a good law, but there is room for improvement.

“We welcome the changes proposed so far, but call on the government to expand them further to protect animals in line with community expectations.

“The RSPCA Queensland is still continuing discussions with the government regarding the Animal Care and Welfare Regulations, which will cover other animal welfare topics.”

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