Caring for Animals and People: What Happens If You Test Positive for Covid-19 | 1 NEWS

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Quarantine can be a scary thought, but public health officials don’t want it to deter people from getting tested for Covid-19.

Almost all positive Covid-19 cases in Auckland are transferred to a quarantine facility and people are urged to plan ahead for anything that requires special care, such as pets, plants or people.

WHAT HAPPENS IF YOU TEST POSITIVE FOR COVID-19?

While negative results are sent by text, people who test positive for Covid-19 will always be contacted first by phone, said Chief Health Officer Dr Ashley Bloomfield.

From there, the Auckland Regional Public Health Service (ARPHS) says it has dedicated maanaki, or wellness, teams to help people and their whānau.

“Once these needs are determined, the appropriate support is provided to the extent possible,” a spokesperson told 1News.

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MY PLANTS NEED TO BE WATERED DURING THE QUARANTINE?

It’s a common problem when you think of time away from home: who takes care of your plants?

If you develop Covid-19 and need to go into quarantine, you can ask close family, friends or trusted neighbors to help you take care of your plants, the ARHPS spokesperson said.

WHO TAKES CARE OF MY PET IF I NEED TO QUARANTINE?

SPCA COO Sam Powell encourages people to plan ahead for pet care in case of an emergency.

If you test positive for Covid-19, you can always ask someone to come to your home to feed and care for your pet.

“Don’t worry or be discouraged about taking a test because you worry about your pet. There are things in place to support people,” she told 1News.

“The SPCA is here to help in any way it can and wants to reassure people that their pets will not be left without care if they need to be quarantined.”

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Jordyn Rudd breaks down everything you need to know. Source: 1 NEWS


Such care could mean helping to organize a cattery or kennel for your pet to stay, if not cared for at home.

As a last resort, Powell says they can also temporarily help care for animals at the SPCA facilities. They have already done this for a handful of cases.

“If that’s the case there, we’re more than happy to help, and a lot of times we can talk about some of these things with people, and that’s helpful, too,” Powell said.

“Really, it’s often a tough time for people, so sometimes we have to talk and we have a lot of information on our website.”

WHAT HAPPENS TO MY KIDS IF I NEED TO GO FOR QUARANTINE?

Just like pets, some people care for other people, whether they are young children or the elderly.

If you test positive for Covid-19 and have dependents such as children, they may be quarantined with you, according to ARPHS.

“When a case has a support person, arrangements can also be made to move that support person with the case, if necessary. “

Manaaki staff will help people find the appropriate services and resources to safely isolate themselves, ARHPS said.

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WHAT IF I WANT TO QUARANTINE AT HOME RATHER?

Exemptions to stay at home rather than quarantine are rare and granted on a “case by case” basis, according to the ARPHS.

“[Exemptions] can be granted when, for example, there are complex medical or social situations, ”said the spokesperson.

If an exemption is granted, help is available for people isolated at home.

“Examples of support available include food, baby’s needs, toiletries, laundry help, and financial assistance as needed. “

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said there were no concerns over filling the quarantine facilities, with around 150 places still available.

“They are increasing steadily as those who recover from our facilities,” she explains.

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Not all variants of Covid-19 are created equal. Source: Seven Sharp


The Department of Health is urging Aucklanders to continue getting tested if they have symptoms.

According to the World Health Organization, the main symptoms associated with the Delta variant include a cough, sore throat, headache and fever, as well as headache, runny nose, and loss of blood. smell or taste.

“Testing at high levels in Auckland remains a critical part of our response to the outbreak to detect every community case and stop transmission,” the Department of Health said.

“We continue to urge anyone in Auckland with symptoms of a cold or flu, however mild, to come forward for testing.”

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